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Calendar Big Oscars Issue : Oscar Bits

March 26, 1995|Susan King

CUT AND RUN

The documentary "Hoop Dreams" is nominated this year for best film editing. The first documentary nominated in that category was 1970's "Woodstock."

NO PUSHING

The bleachers outside the Shrine Auditorium this year will be able to hold 2,200 fans. Only 900 seats were available at the Music Center last year. The bleacher seats will be available to the public today at 2 p.m. No bleacher tickets will be issued this year; seating is on a first-come, first-served basis.

KING CHARLES

Twenty-one years after winning his Oscar, Charles Laughton reprised his role of Henry VIII in the MGM film "Young Bess."

STEPPING UP

Best actor nominee Tom Hanks ("Forrest Gump") made his film debut in a little-seen, low-budget 1981 horror flick, "He Knows You're Alone," above.

FOR THE RECORD
Los Angeles Times Sunday April 2, 1995 Home Edition Calendar Page 99 Calendar Desk 1 inches; 25 words Type of Material: Correction
Berlin boo-boo--Last Sunday's Oscar Bits column misidentified the film in which Bing Crosby introduced the 1942 Oscar-winning tune "White Christmas." It was "Holiday Inn."

FOUNDING FATHERS

Original members of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences actors branch included: Richard Barthelmess, Jack Holt, Conrad Nagel, Milton Sills, Douglas Fairbanks and Harold Lloyd. The directors branch was headed by Cecil B. DeMille, Frank Lloyd, Henry King, Fred Niblo, John M. Stahl and Raoul Walsh.

The Irving

The Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award, which Clint Eastwood will receive this year, is a solid bronze head of Thalberg, resting on a black marble base. It weighs 10 3/4 pounds and is 9 inches tall. The trophy design was supervised by Cedric Gibbons and executed by sculptor Bernard Sopher.

OLIVIER'S CROWN

Laurence Olivier is the only performer to direct himself to a best actor Oscar. He directed himself in the 1948 Oscar-winner "Hamlet." He lost the best director award to John Huston for "The Treasure of the Sierra Madre."

BURT & WALTER

Burt Lancaster, who won a best actor Oscar for 1960's "Elmer Gantry," directed only one film in his long career: 1955's "The Kentuckian." The film also marked the debut of Walter Matthau, who later won the 1966 best supporting actor Oscar for "'The Fortune Cookie."

TRIPLE THREATS

Clark Gable, Meryl Streep, Dustin Hoffman, Shirley MacLaine, Diane Keaton and John Cazale all have appeared in three best-picture Oscar-winning films. Gable starred in 1934's "It Happened One Night," 1935's "Mutiny on the Bounty" and 1939's "Gone With the Wind." Streep appeared in 1978's "The Deer Hunter," 1979's "Kramer vs. Kramer" and 1985's "Out of Africa." Dustin Hoffman starred in 1969's "Midnight Cowboy," 1979's "Kramer vs. Kramer" and 1988's "Rain Man." Shirley MacLaine appeared in 1956's "Around the World in 80 Days," 1960's "The Apartment" and 1983's "Terms of Endearment." Diane Keaton starred in 1972's "The Godfather," 1974's "The Godfather, Part II" and 1977's "Annie Hall." John Cazale was featured in 1972's "The Godfather," 1974's "The Godfather Part II" and 1978's "The Deer Hunter" (pictured above, center).

NATURAL BORN ACTOR

Best director and screenplay nominee Quentin Tarantino ("Pulp Fiction") played an Elvis impersonator on a 1988 episode of the NBC sitcom "The Golden Girls."

TOPS IN TAPS AND MORE

Fred Astaire won a 1949 special Oscar for his "unique artistry and his contributions to the technique of musical pictures."

LEAPIN' LANDAU

Martin Landau, a best supporting actor nominee this year for "Ed Wood," was one of the stars of the 1981 TV film "The Harlem Globetrotters on Gilligan's Island."

SWITCH-HITTER

Best supporting actor nominee Gary Sinise ("Forrest Gump") began his feature film career behind the camera, as director of the 1988 Richard Gere movie "Miles From Home."

ANTICLIMAX

The first Academy Awards, which took place May 16, 1929, were presented three months after the winners had been announced in the press.

WIEST MOVE

Woody Allen has the chance of becoming the first director to guide a performer to double Oscars. He directed Dianne Wiest to a best supporting Oscar for 1986's "Hannah and Her Sisters"; he also directed her to a best supporting nomination this year for "Bullets Over Broadway."

BING'S BUNCH

Bing Crosby introduced four Oscar-winning tunes: 1937's "Sweet Leilani" from "Waikiki Wedding"; "White Christmas" from 1942's "White Christmas" "Swinging on a Star" from 1944's "Going My Way" and "In the Cool, Cool, Cool of the Evening" from 1951's "Here Comes the Groom."

REPEAT WINNERS

If Tom Hanks, who won best actor last year for "Philadelphia," wins for "Forrest Gump," he'll only be the fifth performer to win back-to-back Oscars. Luise Rainer won best actress for 1936's "The Great Ziegfeld" and 1937's "The Good Earth"; Spencer Tracy won best actor for 1937's "Captains Courageous" and 1938's "Boys Town"; Katharine Hepburn won best actress for 1967's "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner" and 1968's "The Lion in Winter"; and Jason Robards won best supporting actor for 1976's "All the President's Men" and 1977's "Julia."

Driving Solo

Only two films have won the best picture honor without the director being nominated: 1931-32's "Grand Hotel" and 1989's "Driving Miss Daisy" (above, with Jessica Tandy and Morgan Freeman).

FOUR FOR FORD

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