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Prime-Time Flicks

August 06, 1995|Kevin Thomas

Playing a cold-blooded murderess who flares across the screen like a torch, Beverly D'Angelo kicks into overdrive the 1992 Trial: The Price of Passion (NBC Sunday at 9 p.m., concluding Monday at 9 p.m.). This is essentially a standard courtroom suspense drama.

Survive the Savage Sea (ABC Sunday at 9 p.m.), a 1992 TV movie, is a bracing good yarn that catches that most basic conflict, man vs. nature. Robert Urich and Ali MacGraw star as a couple with three children whose 50-foot schooner is capsized in the dead of night by whales.

Oliver Stone's 1988 Talk Radio (KTLA Monday at 8 p.m.) makes you laugh, makes you mad and keeps you on the edge watching for killers in the shadows. Eric Bogosian stars in this savagely audacious movie of his play about the dangerous games played between a performer and his audience, a society and its malcontents and the medium of radio and the faceless voices it broadcasts. The film was inspired by the fate of controversial Denver talk-show host Alan Berg.

Absorbingly directed by Tony Richardson, the 1982 The Border (KTLA Tuesday at 8 p.m.) is the most unjustly neglected picture in Jack Nicholson's career. It takes a compassionate look at the plight of illegal immigrants along the U.S.-Mexico border; Nicholson plays a border patrolman increasingly disaffected with his job of forcing Mexicans back to their side of the Rio Grande.

Enjoying Two Jakes (KTLA Thursday at 7:30 p.m.), the 1990 sequel to "Chinatown," depends upon how well you remember the original film. But it does capture post-World War II Los Angeles from the perspective of a detective mystery. Jack Nicholson's Harry Gittes returns, a decade later, to the corruption that lies beneath the spires of Los Angeles wealth and power.

In the 1991 He Said, She Said (KTLA Saturday at 3 p.m.) there's a kernel of fun in the idea of twin views--his and hers--of the same contemporary romance. The movie most closely hits home with Elizabeth Perkins and Kevin Bacon's wildly different memories of the same event; still, the social commentary is weak.

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