Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections

Taking Care in Treatment of Artwork

August 26, 1995|KATHY BRYANT

Cost often determines how an artwork is framed, but if the art is not adequately protected, problems may develop. Proper materials and appropriate glazing will help preserve it.

Here are some questions to ask of your framer:

* What kind of mat and backboards will be used? The mat boards should be 100% cotton fiber, and the backboards should be acid-free material.

* How will the art be attached to the mat board? Proper mounting of the art should never be permanent; pH neutral Japanese paper and wheat- or rice-starch paste are strong yet reversible and don't harm the artwork.

* What type of glazing will be used? Glass and acrylic glazing are the most common. The medium used to create the work will often determine which glazing is correct. The size of the glazing and whether the framed piece will be shipped are other considerations. Glass is usually recommended for pastels and charcoals. UV filtering acrylic glazing is best for light-sensitive works, such as watercolors and prints.

* Is the artwork separated from the glazing material? Artwork that is in contact with the glazing may stick to the surface, which can lift the image or tear the paper. Condensation can cause the artwork to stain. If the artwork is not mounted inside a mat, acid-free material may be used to set the art from the glazing.

For framer referrals, contact a local museum employee and ask whom they use.

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|