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The Fuhrman Tapes : THE O.J. SIMPSON MURDER TRIAL

August 30, 1995

"When I was working gang, we used to take people, you know. We'd get a murder. We'd have a murder. And sometimes two or three murders. And you'd know which gang did it. But they wouldn't talk. So I would go and pick up three or four gang members and bring them to the station. Take one in the basement and beat the dog s--- out of him. And not even asking him a question. Bring him up and sit him down. He's bleeding. Face is all puffed up, got hurt. Next guy, take him downstairs. 'OK, who shot him?' . . . That's how you get information. What is this patty cake, patty cake . . . psychology? Well, we have to teach our officers some Spanish. This is America. We don't speak Spanish here. Work Mexican gangs, and I don't know how to speak any Spanish. . . . When they speak Spanish. ' No comprende .' Slap them upside the head. Then they speak English. I'm an English teacher. Just like that. That's police work. . . ."

"I've been on several calls in West L.A. where I'm in the third or fourth call--third or fourth car--and I end up handling the whole situation. . . . Then you go to court and I'm the only one who knows how to testify. The D.A. goes, 'Yeah, but you were the fourth car there.' But would you testify? 'Yeah, but you didn't see'--I saw it. Don't worry about it. Yeah, I saw him do that. Yeah, yeah. OK. Goodby. Why do I have to do everything? That's what it is coming down to. I have to fight the guy. I have to catch the guy. I have to keep the guy's mouth shut at the station because they are not going to do it for a female. I can just walk by and go, 'Shut up or I'm going to kick your face in. . . .' "

"You have to be a switch-hitter. You have to be able to look at your area and look at how you talk to people, look at how you deal with things and what you can and can't do, even with a criminal. You can't go up in Bel-Air. And some guy gives you a hard time in broad daylight. And slap them. 'Damn it, I want to know what's going on.' You just don't do that. I mean, it's obvious. But when you work down in the south end, Watts, the metropolitan area, you work Skid Row, you use your stick more than your mouth. You don't care. Don't try to tell people to go there, go there. You just use your stick. They'll move. They see no problem with that. They're where they are not supposed to be."

"I'm the key witness in the biggest case of the century. And if I go down, they lose the case. The glove is everything. Without the glove--bye, bye."

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