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The Rest Of Tv's Biggest Power Players

September 10, 1995

DAVID ANGELL, PETER CASEY, DAVID LEE

Writer-producers

These three have scored a Tuesday hat trick--in addition to their hits "Frasier" and "Wings," their new show, "The Pursuit of Happiness," will premiere with the potent "Frasier" lead-in this fall. The trio has prospered while working with Paramount, and insiders say they could walk into any network and come away with a deal.

ROONE ARLEDGE

President, ABC News

Arledge, 64, continues to be a dominant force in television as he eases into his 18th year at the helm of what was a third-place division when he started. Now "World News Tonight" is the longtime ratings leader among nightly newscasts, "Nightline" often ranks first in late night, and "20/20" and "PrimeTime Live" are going strong in prime time.

BEST-SELLING AUTHORS

Last year we got Tom Clancy's "Op Center," Danielle Steel's "Perfect Stranger" and "Family Album" and Stephen King's "The Langoliers." Michael Crichton gave us "ER" as well. This season there's the series "John Grisham's The Client." As they are in feature films, authors are increasingly valuable as sources for television film and series material.

STUART BLOOMBERG

Executive Vice President for Prime Time Entertainment, ABC

Bloomberg is widely considered to be one of the best developers in the business. He is also known to have a prickly relationship with some creators. "Some of these producers want their asses kissed more than Stuart is willing to do," said one insider. "He's very honest, and he demands honesty in return."

STEVEN BOCHCO

Writer-producer

Probably the most powerful and well-regarded producer and creator in television, Bochco, 51, is seen as a true visionary who has changed the face of television with such series as "Hill Street Blues," "L.A. Law" and his current "NYPD Blue." Long-term deals with ABC, and now CBS, ensure that what he dreams up gets on the air.

JAMES BURROWS

Director

The Sultan of Sitcoms. Burrows, 54, is regarded as the man with the golden touch, having directed the pilot episodes of such hit series as "Friends," "Cheers," "Frasier," "NewsRadio" and "Wings." Although he has had his share of flops, his sharp eye for getting the most out of a script has made him one of TV's most sought-after directors.

MARCY CARSEY, TOM WERNER

Producers

The Carsey-Werner Co. is considered one of the most successful comedy producers on television, having built huge hits around popular comedians Roseanne, Bill Cosby and Brett Butler. The former ABC executives are noted for their ability to attract great stars and have often let the lead talent take control of the show.

ERNEST DEL

Attorney

With clients such as CBS Entertainment President Leslie Moonves and actor-producer Paul Reiser, Del, 43, is highly regarded as one of the few power attorneys in television. He is best known for putting clients together with studios or network executives in order to create a package.

JON FELTHEIMER

President, Sony Television

Feltheimer, 43, may be best known in industry circles as a smooth salesman, but his real strength lies in building TV divisions. In 1984, he successfully launched New World Television. When Sony acquired most of New World's assets in 1991, he was asked to start from scratch again with TriStar Television. Result: "Mad About You" and "The Nanny."

LEE GABLER

Creative Artists Agency

Gabler, 45, is president of CAA's TV department and one of its three new co-chairmen. CAA represents such high-powered clients as David Letterman, Aaron Spelling and the production teams of Wind Dancer and Miller-Boyett. "Everyone likes Lee," said one insider. "His strength is that he's a practical, bottom-line guy."

BRAD GREY

Manager, producer

Grey, 37, represents an aggressive new breed of personal manager with the pull to package and produce TV shows for his 100-plus clients. His charges include Garry Shandling, Dana Carvey, Phil Hartman and a stable of premier TV writers. Grey and his partner, Bernie Brillstein, oversee "The Larry Sanders Show" and have a production deal with ABC.

ROBERT HALMI

Chair, Hallmark Entertainment

When it comes to TV movies, Halmi defies comparison. Last year, Hallmark bought out his RHI Entertainment empire for $365 million. The 72-year-old Hungarian will produce 58 movies this year for broadcast and cable, roughly one-fourth of the industry's annual output. He's winding down a 12-picture deal with ABC and gearing up for a 36-picture deal with Fox.

HBO

Under Chairman Michael Fuchs, the pay-TV channel has emerged as television's torchbearer of quality. Feature producers, directors and actors claw to get their special projects made under HBO Pictures President Bob Cooper. Chris Albrecht heads original programming; industry observers are waiting to see if he'll miss former colleague Bridget Potter, who resigned during the summer.

TONY JONAS

President, Warner Bros. TV

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