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Bono in Slo-Mo Sets Record With His Feet : Interconference: His 76-yard touchdown run is longest by an NFL quarterback and helps Chiefs beat Cardinals, 24-3.

October 02, 1995|From Associated Press

TEMPE, Ariz. — The Arizona Cardinals knew the Kansas City Chiefs would be tough. They didn't expect them to be devious too.

Steve Bono's two touchdown passes in the Chiefs' 24-3 victory Sunday didn't qualify, although one was to third-string lineman Joe Valerio.

It was his 76-yard touchdown run that qualified as a shocker.

"In four previous games, they hadn't shown a bootleg," outside linebacker Seth Joyner said after Bono faked a handoff to Marcus Allen, then took off on the longest scoring run by a quarterback in NFL history.

"My job is to contain the quarterback on that play, keep the ball inside of me, and I was blocked in on the dive play and I went for the play."

The slow-footed Bono circled to his right while Allen was being wrestled down and ran, in apparent disbelief, untouched along the sideline while Valerio waved him on to the score that started the Chiefs on their way to victory.

"I thought for sure there would be someone out there, and that's why we had [Valerio] there," said Bono, an 11th-year player from UCLA who started only 11 games over 10 previous seasons while mostly linked with Joe Montana.

"I needed to get into the record books with Joe somehow," Bono quipped.

Detroit's Greg Landry had a 76-yard, non-scoring run Sept. 27, 1970.

Later in the second quarter, it was Valerio's turn to score. Bono connected with him on a one-yard touchdown pass on a tackle-eligible play to give the Chiefs (4-1) a 14-0 lead at halftime.

The 6-foot-5, 295-pound guard-center was uncovered for his fourth career touchdown.

"The first person I saw was the ref, and I was hoping he didn't make the tackle," Valerio said.

Bono connected with Lake Dawson on a 14-yard touchdown pass in the third quarter, and the Chiefs went ahead, 24-0, on Lin Elliott's 28-yard field goal later in the quarter.

Meanwhile, the defense toyed with the Cardinals (1-4), sacking Dave Krieg seven times for 68 yards and stopping Arizona twice on downs. Krieg, who passed for 308 yards, faced a final insult when Brian Washington picked off his throw at the one-yard line just before the two-minute warning.

Earlier in the fourth quarter, the seventh sack forced Arizona to settle for a 48-yard field goal by Greg Davis.

Arizona's Terry Hoage intercepted Bono's pass in the end zone in the first quarter.

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