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Affirmative Action

October 22, 1995

* "Thousands Rally at UC Campuses for Affirmative Action" (Oct. 13) mentions that "the vast majority of students chose not to participate in the protests."

Throughout this nation's history, the majority of the people always stayed in their daily routines. It was the few (led by Crispus Attucks) who physically started the challenge to the British for this nation. It was the few who ranted and railed against slavery. It was the precious few of the white American population who helped African Americans break this nation's man-made laws to run away to freedom. It was the few who marched in civil rights demonstrations of the '50s and '60s.

The vast majority stayed where they belonged--home, in class, or at their place of business. Freedom fighters come only from the ranks of the brave. That's how we started, and that's how we'll keep going until the American dream is lived by all Americans, even if most of you continue to stay home. Again the "silent majority" is misinterpreted as being against opportunity, fairness and freedom. Is this correct?

GRAYCE L. GADSON

Toluca Lake

* Lets see if I "get it." Students demanding preferential treatment at California universities based on the color of their skin are called "protesters." If white students staged a rally in favor of abolishing affirmative action, they would probably be called racist. Admission to universities should be based on academic merit, not numerical quotas. There should be one scholastic standard for all students.

The protesters demand a "renewed commitment to diversity." How about a renewed commitment to academic excellence? Should students be admitted to a university based on the color of their skin, or the content of their academic character?

F. DAVID DORAN

San Clemente

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