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Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and . . .

February 10, 1996|CYNDI Y. NIGHTENGALE

The smell of a rose is forever sweet, but if you want to wake up your senses with something more unique, consider the scent of herbs.

The fresh herb bouquet by Gardener's Eden ($26 plus shipping and handling), offered through Williams-Sonoma's outdoor living catalog, will fill the air with the aroma of lavender, marjoram, sage, rosemary and French thyme.

The bouquet, 11 inches by 12 inches, can be placed immediately into water--the herbs will stay fresh for up to two weeks this way--or it can be hung upside-down for drying and preserving.

Other uses for the bouquet include putting some of the lavender in bathwater to soothe aches and pains, mixing it with potpourri to freshen the air or using it in the kitchen to season favorite dishes.

The bouquet comes wrapped and tied with an organic jute bow.

Call Gardener's Eden at (800) 541-2233.

Herbal Essences

Aromatherapy takes on a decidedly herbal note with the fragrance mist collection by Thymes Limited.

The three scents--lavender, eucalyptus and vetiver--are packaged in brushed aluminum canisters that are nonflammable, noncombustible and ozone-friendly.

Vetiver is a warm and enticing scent; eucalyptus is cool and refreshing, and lavender is lush and sensual.

There are no oils and wet residues in the spray, so nothing will fall out or harm your upholstery and fine furniture.

The mists (4 ounces, $13 each) can also be used to spruce up bed linens, towels and curtains.

For the nearest store, call (800) 366-4071.

On the Couch

The newest generation of sofa beds won't lie down on the job.

The Inspiration sofa bed, designed by Rolf Benz, is ideal when space is a consideration. Since it allows you to sleep in the length of the sofa rather than the width, it opens out to only 60 inches instead of the standard 90 inches of most sleeper beds.

"You also don't have the problem of someone sleeping in the crack," says Elyse Lacher, president of New York-based Cymann International, which distributes the bed.

To convert the sofa into a bed, simply pull the seat cushion forward and push the back down.

The sofa bed ($3,100 to $4,000), which comes with a matte black or brushed aluminum frame, has headrests and takes queen-size linens. The upholstery cover is available in several colors and fabrics, including leather.

For information, contact Randolph and Hein, Pacific Design Center in Los Angeles, (310) 855-1222.

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