Advertisement

GRAMMYS '96

Hey, It's Bob Newhart! Crank It Up, Man!

February 25, 1996|Steve Hochman

Rock and Roll Hall of Famers Who Never Won a Grammy: the Band, the Beach Boys, Chuck Berry, the Byrds, Sam Cooke, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Cream, the Doors, the Drifters, the Four Tops, the Grateful Dead, Jimi Hendrix, the Jackson 5, the Jefferson Airplane, Janis Joplin, Led Zeppelin, Little Richard, Bob Marley, Van Morrison, the Supremes, the Who, Hank Williams Sr., the Velvet Underground. (The Rolling Stones' only Grammy came last year--for "Voodoo Lounge" as best rock album--long after the group was inducted into the rock hall.)

*

People Who've Won More Grammys Than Chuck Berry: Bob Newhart (his "Button-Down Mind" was album of the year for 1960); the Rev. Jesse Jackson (best spoken-word performance, 1988, for a track on Aretha Franklin's album "One Lord, One Faith, One Baptism"); Magic Johnson (best spoken-word performance, 1992, for "What You Can Do to Avoid AIDS").

*

Clergy Rock: Jackson isn't the only person of the cloth to win. The 1970 spoken-word award went to a posthumous release of speeches by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., and between 1981 and 1989, the Rev. Al Green won eight awards in the soul and soul gospel categories. Sister Luc-Gabrielle, the Singing Nun, won 1963's gospel award for "Dominique" but lost in the record of the year race to Henry Mancini's "The Days of Wine and Roses."

*

Comedy Tonight: Vaughn Meader's "The First Family" took album of the year honors for 1962, giving comedy two wins in the top slot in three years. It was the only two times nonmusical recordings won in a top category.

*

Who Beat the Beatles?: "Hello Dolly!" (1964 song of the year over "A Hard Day's Night"); Petula Clark's "Downtown" (topped "A Hard Day's Night" as 1964's best rock 'n' roll recording); Glen Campbell's "By the Time I Get to Phoenix" (1968's album of the year over "Magical Mystery Tour").

*

TKO: Pudgy song satirist Allan Sherman scored a knockout over young Cassius Clay when his letter from camp "Hello Muddah Hello Faddah" beat "I Am the Greatest" for 1963's best comedy recording.

*

How Great He Was: Elvis Presley won three Grammys--but only for his late-'60s and early-'70s religious recordings.

*

African American Firsts: It wasn't until the 15th Grammy presentation, in 1973, that an African American won in one of the top four categories, with Roberta Flack getting record of the year for "The First Time Ever I Saw His Face"; Natalie Cole was first to win best new artist, in 1975.

*

Backhanded Compliments: The only Grammy ever won by composer-arranger Neil Hefti--noted for his work with Woody Herman and Count Basie, author of the jazz standard "Li'l Darlin'," composer of "The Odd Couple" score--was for writing the 1966 "Batman" TV theme. . . Dean Torrance's musical talents with Jan Dean were never deemed worthy of a Grammy, but his graphic arts skills earned him the 1971 album cover award for an album by the group Pollution.

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|