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Los Angeles Architecture and Landmarks

February 25, 1996

I would like to commend The Times for its Feb. 18 Opinion articles on architecture, "A City Lost--and Found" by Jim Heimann and "Back to the Future" by Kevin Starr. On the same day in Calendar were "From a Different Angle" about the MOCA's eye-opening exhibit on renowned architect Frank Israel and "Preserving Schindler's L.A. Legacy."

We have initiated an architectural study within the framework of Art Alliance, the support group of the California State University Fullerton Art Department. Our study, which meets weekly, has encompassed such diverse areas of interest as the Pacific Electric's red cars, Art Deco and Beaux Arts of L.A., the Case Study Houses, the "sacred spaces" churches of L.A. and restoration and preservation of Pasadena architecture.

CONNIE L. ROSENQUIST

Docent Chair

CSUF Art Alliance

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* We always enjoy articles on L.A.'s architectural heritage, and the Pan Pacific in particular. Please inform Heimann, though, that my uncle's first name was Walter, not William.

JOHN WURDEMAN

Ridgecrest

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* The articles spoke brilliantly of our historic image and our future found in Los Angeles. Above the Los Angeles Basin sits a stellar example of upward-looking vision. Since 1935, Griffith Observatory has offered to millions of people the beauty of unparalleled architecture, an accessible message of our first science, astronomy; and free glances through a telescope built especially to look upward from ignorance.

Changes are and will always be coming. When Griffith Observatory hosts events related to the fabulous astronomical things we're learning of late, tens of thousands of people come to get reliable information on our changing vision of the universe and they also get the very best view of the great city of Los Angeles.

Griffith Observatory not only deserves support for its own upcoming renovation and expansion but stands as a monument to upward vision, and as Starr said, "being in contact with one's fellow human beings in that symphonic arrangement of space and time and human life called the city."

KARA KNACK, President

Friends of the Observatory

Los Angeles

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* Re "Twin Towers, Temporarily," Feb. 16: 1939 was a truly historic year in television. Not only did W6XAO move up to Mt. Lee, but New York finally got scheduled service and we got our second station, W6XYZ, which became KTLA.

But, as is apparent from the article, the tower in the photograph isn't Los Angeles' first television broadcast tower, just its first mountain-peak TV tower. When W6XAO first lit up nearly 65 years ago, its antenna tower was atop the old Don Lee Cadillac building at 7th and Bixel streets, downtown. That structure was razed about five years ago, just as the recession was starting, so redevelopment has been delayed. I hope whatever eventually goes up on the site will include a plaque commemorating the location of the world's first television station (the first open to the public, with a daily, publicly announced schedule).

THOMAS D. BRATTER

Los Angeles

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