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Hunter Gatherers

February 29, 1996

To look at this china with the curly green stripe and the natural, sturdy construction, you might think it is a contemporary design from a local artist. In fact, the Green Stripe is a 300-year-old pattern from Austrian producer Gmundner Keramik. The perfect backdrop for a hearty meal after a day of hunting and gathering, or even a rough day of hunting and pecking at the keyboard, these ceramics are still made from the ancient clay deposits found in the Alpine town of Gmunden. The striped designs also come in yellow and blue, and there's a variety of other patterns, including the centuries-old Hunt Scene pattern. Available at Mise-En Place on Hillhurst in Los Feliz.

Orange Aid

Most of us think of turmeric as a yellow powder that brightens up rice and other dishes. But there is also fresh turmeric, a knobby little rhizome that looks like ginger root (it belongs to the same botanical family) but is smaller and orange-fleshed. Fresh turmeric is milder than the ground spice most people use, and it doesn't stain like the dried spice. Try it in soups and stew for subtle, exotic flavor. Available in Chinese, Thai and other such Asian markets as the 99 Ranch and Bangluck chains.

Old Glaze, New Tricks

Many wine lovers know Sarah Chamberlin as one of the partners of Santa Barbara's acclaimed Au Bon Climat winery. Food lovers should know her for the colorful ceramic pieces she creates using a centuries-old technique, majolica. A Chamberlin platter makes food look terrific. Despite her ancient ways, of course, she's devised her glazes so that they contain no lead and the earthenware can be used in the oven, microwave or dishwasher. Available at Freehand on 3rd Street in Los Angeles.

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