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'Faust's' Tavern Now a Restaurant

May 12, 1996|Reuters

A 16th century tavern made famous by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe's classic work, "Faust," has been reopened in Leipzig, Germany, as an up-market restaurant.

Auerbachs Keller, which opened in 1525, was the drinking spot where Germany's most famous poet used to tipple as a student.

Later Goethe used the tavern as the setting for a scene in his drama "Faust," about a man who sells his soul to the devil for limitless knowledge and youth. The scene, in which the devil directs a drunken orgy, may have been inspired by a carved wooden plaque depicting the legendary

Faust riding on a barrel and guzzling wine with students. The plaque, dating back to 1625, is still on display.

Local chef Ulrich Reinhardt, who bought the lease last year and renovated it as a restaurant to seat 700, said he would offer regional specialties and wines.

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