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American Films

July 07, 1996

* I was surprised at the omission of the 1950 version of "Born Yesterday" by all of the people polled ("The Reel America," Opinion, June 30). To me, this film reflects how education about the liberties we have as a nation can lead to consciousness-raising and liberation for an individual person. In the film, Judy Holliday sees her tyrannical, abusive relationship with Broderick Crawford for what it is, and leaves it, because her heart and mind have been opened to the values of American history by her teacher, William Holden.

STEVE WALLACE

West Hollywood

* The three men who chose "High Noon" missed what I see as the point of the movie, and that they missed it may say as much about "who we are" as the movie does. The final shot in the movie--the one that kills Frank Miller--is fired by Grace Kelly, not Gary Cooper. He is not alone. The man of principle is saved at the end because the woman of principle loves him. This film is one of the great romantic adventures of all time.

CATHERINE DAIN

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