Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections

Removing Concrete From L.A. River

August 18, 1996

I read with astonishment the inaccurate statements by Friends of the L.A. River writers Jan Chatten-Brown and Mark Ryavec, in Opinion (Aug. 11), mentioning how other cities have turned their rivers into showpieces, and advocating removal of the concrete from the L.A. River so greenery, picnic tables and other public amenities can be substituted.

The river was placed in a concrete straitjacket because it traverses a densely populated region, posing a constant threat on occasions when torrential rains hit. Before it was channelized, it jumped its banks on numerous occasions, killing people and destroying the city's central plaza. At one time it emptied into the ocean near Redondo Beach. If authorities agree to their request to tear down the walls, the question is who would pay the legal compensation for the deaths of picnickers or property owners in a sudden flash flood.

Their sweetener suggestion that the concrete removal would somehow add to our water supplies, and allow us to cut back on imported water, is another indication that the writers need to do a little more research. The river is already maxed out as a source of water, with intercepting wells throughout the city. However, even if more water could be squeezed out, it would not eliminate the need for imported water and any cutback would be minuscule.

LEON FURGATCH

Granada Hills

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|