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THE CUTTING EDGE

This Week

September 02, 1996

* Tuesday, 6 p.m.: Sea explorer Jacques Cousteau discusses his 65 years of ocean study. America Online. Keyword: Dive

* Wednesday, 4:30 p.m.: Why watch the MTV Video Music Awards on television when you can follow along in cyberspace? Internet. http://www.mtv.com

* Wednesday, 5 p.m.: The Rev. Al Sharpton goes online to preach about his new book, "Go and Tell Pharaoh." Prodigy. Jump: Chat

* Sunday, 6 p.m.: Go backstage at the Emmy Awards, one of the biggest show biz fetes of the year. Prodigy. Jump: Chat

ON THE NET

* Political campaigns are often reduced to sound bites these days, but political posters are still a mainstay of the election season. The Verlangieri Virtual Gallery of Art (http://www.thebook.com/verlangieri) has a display of U.S. political posters dating back to 1832, including an Abraham Lincoln/Andrew Johnson poster from 1860 and a 1901 poster depicting Teddy Roosevelt as an "apostle of prosperity." Visitors can also read up on the origins of the Democratic and Republican parties.

* Other Voices (http://www.ibm.com/OtherVoices) explores the impact of computers on business and society. There are articles culled from around the Web on issues such as marketing on the global computer network, the future of chief information officers, how easy it should be to find computerized public records, and ethics for Internet users.

* Want to view the live birth of two Asian rhinoceros calves via Webcam? Yes?? Then check out http://www.purinacares.com/caresfund/live.htm. The camera broadcasts from the Smithsonian Institution's National Zoological Park, and the calves are due sometime in mid-September.

* Want to commune with like-minded laborers? You can commiserate at Disgruntled: The Business Magazine for People Who Work for a Living at http://www.disgruntled.com. There's all sorts of news you can use, such as how to get the most out of your union dues and legal resources for victims of employment discrimination. But the most entertaining section contains real-life stories about such things as being fired or quitting, working for inept government agencies and dealing with family businesses.

* What if you were a regular data processor and you suddenly stumbled into a parallel universe full of conspiracy, danger and intrigue? That's the predicament of Ann Elise Hummingbird, the protagonist in a new comic series called "The Startle Pattern." Follow the artistically rich story at http://www.homearts.com/depts/pl/comix/00coc1.htm

* A nice roundup of Wall Street Internet resources aimed at the casual investor, such as financial news, market data, exchanges, brokers and banks, can be searched at http://www.streeteye.com

* Mysterious Places (http://www.mysteriousplaces.com) offers virtual tours of Stonehenge, Easter Island and other locales that were home to ancient civilizations or unexplained phenomena. Point and click to take a virtual tour, including stunning photographs accompanied by short history lessons.

* Find 101 ways to make the world better for children at http://www.kidscampaigns.org. This site, sponsored by the Benton Foundation, shares information on what others are doing in all 50 states and how you can join them. There are also statistics on children from the Census Bureau and links to children's policy sites.

* Although there's no available road map to the Information Superhighway, this new site offers the next best thing: You type in an address in the U.S. and it blasts you back an instant street map. It's at http://www.mapblast.com/

* Do you spend so much time typing away at your computer that you suffer from a repetitive stress injury? If so, check out the LA RSI Support Group's home page at http://www.geocities.com/HotSprings/1702. Learn more about the condition through links to other Internet resources and find the date and location of the group's upcoming meetings.

* A new site for baseball lovers contains a nice collection of links to just about every baseball park in the U.S., including photos and descriptions. It is at http://www.ballpark.com

Site suggestions can be sent to cutting.edge@latimes.com

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