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HOT PROPERTY

Retreat From Mean Streets

September 08, 1996|RUTH RYON | TIMES STAFF WRITER

DENNIS FRANZ, nominated for his third Emmy in a row as lead actor in a drama series for his work in ABC's "NYPD Blue," and his wife, Joanie, have purchased a Montecito retreat for just under $2 million, sources say.

Franz, who just completed his third season playing Det. Andy Sipowicz in "NYPD Blue," also was named in the 12th annual Quality Awards as best actor in a drama. Those awards will be handed out Sept. 28 in Los Angeles. The Emmy Awards will be presented at 8 tonight on ABC.

Franz also stars with Dustin Hoffman and Sean Nelson in the filmed version of David Mamet's play "American Buffalo," to be released on Friday. This fall, Franz also will join the voice cast of the "Disney Afternoon" animated series "Mighty Ducks," playing Officer Klegghorn.

Franz, 51, appeared in 1983 in a two-part guest spot as corrupt cop Sal Benedetto in the NBC series "Hill Street Blues" before joining the cast as Lt. Norman Buntz during the series' final two seasons. Soon afterward, he teamed with Bruce Willis in "Die Hard 2, Die Harder" (1990).

The Franzes bought a turn-of-the-century home with five bedrooms in 5,000 square feet, on two acres with a tennis court.

A native of Illinois, the actor moved to the Los Angeles area 26 years ago. He and his wife maintain their primary residence in West Los Angeles.

Skip Harkson of Fred Sands Realtors, Montecito, represented the couple in buying their Montecito home.

Singer/songwriter KENNETH "BABYFACE" EDMONDS, who won this year's Grammy Award as producer of the year, and his recording executive wife, Tracey, have purchased a Holmby Hills home for about $4.2 million and listed their Beverly Hills home at just under $3 million.

Edmonds, 38, has written songs for such artists as Whitney Houston, Michael Jackson and Madonna. He has created more than 100 Top 10 R&B and pop hits, scored the soundtrack for "Waiting to Exhale" and is co-owner of Atlanta-based LaFace Records.

His biggest recent project was "Rhythm of the Games," a compilation of R&B and pop music for this summer's Olympic Games. The album features Gloria Estefan and others, including himself. His solo albums "Tender Lover" and "For the Cool in You" each sold more than 2 million copies.

Tracey Edmonds, 28, is president and owner of Century City-based Yab Yum Records, a subsidiary of Sony Music focusing on new talent. A Stanford University graduate, she sold real estate before meeting Edmonds.

The couple decided to buy a larger house to accommodate their growing family, sources say. They are expecting their first child this month.

They bought a 12,000-square-foot house on an acre with gardens, a pool, pool house, sauna and gym. Built in 1989, the seven-bedroom home also has an entry with a 40-foot ceiling, two family rooms and a library. The home sold within 10 days of being listed at $4.75 million, sources say.

The Edmondses' Beverly Hills home has six bedrooms in about 7,000 square feet. Built in 1976, the French Regency-style home also has a library-projection room, pool and spa.

Jeffrey Hall of John Aaroe & Associates, Pacific Design Center, has the listing. Carl Timothy and Evelyn Bostok, of the same office, had the listing on the Holmby Hills house. Jacqueline McQuarn of Re/Max Sunset Brokers represented the Edmondses on their purchase.

The last and longtime residence of ARMAND HAMMER, the late billionaire industrialist and art patron, has come on the market at $2.25 million.

The home has four bedrooms and a guest house in about 4,500 square feet. Situated in Little Holmby Hills about a block from a golf course Hammer donated to the city, the home also has an indoor pool.

Hammer, founder and chairman of Occidental Petroleum, died in 1990 at 92. His wife, who died in 1989 at 87, had owned the home, built in 1936, since shortly before she married him in 1956. Her niece inherited the home, sources say.

Sue Ann Simon of the Prudential-Jon Douglas Co., Beverly Hills, has the listing.

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