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The Thinker and the Doer

THE SUNDAY PROFILE

He writes feminist books. She's an agent for 'humane' writers. Keeping their activist ideals intact, Bram and Sandy Dijkstra have forged a literary way of life.

November 24, 1996|IRENE LACHER | TIMES STAFF WRITER

"My motto is to make capitalism work for my authors," she says, "and I would think this is one of the more humane forms of capitalism, the literary business."

* RELATED STORY

Hal Marienthal reviews Bram Dijkstra's "Evil Sisters: The Threat of Female Sexuality and the Cult of Manhood" on page 8 of Book Review.

(BEGIN TEXT OF INFOBOX / INFOGRAPHIC)

Bram Dijkstra

Age: 58.

Native?: Born in Indonesia, now lives in Del Mar.

Family: Married to Sandra for 32 years.

Passions: Art, music and literature.

On the presence of the past: "I'd rather deal with what I see in history. I think that one of the big problems with the American way of doing things is that famous Henry Ford statement, 'History is bunk.' It's still operative in the case of most people."

The lady is a villain: "I would say that probably eight out of 10 murders in the movies are committed by women. In the hard-boiled detective films from the '40s and '50s in particular, it's always a woman who, if she isn't the actual murderer, she drives the man to do it."

On Sandy's contribution to "Evil Sisters": "She said, 'Why don't you shut up and start writing,' and in order to make me write, she sold the book."

(BEGIN TEXT OF INFOBOX / INFOGRAPHIC)

Sandra Dijkstra

Age: "The age of reason."

Native?: Born in the Bronx, now lives in Del Mar.

Family: Married to Bram for 32 years.

Passions: Work, reading and art.

On Bram's feminist credentials: "He's a feminist male rather than a male feminist. I think a male feminist would be politically active in the feminist movement, but a feminist male would be a male with feminist ideas."

Her mother on motherhood: "She understood we had a fantastic relationship and a great life, and she said, 'Why would you want to mess it up? You're so happy the way you are. Children are going to take you in another direction.' "

On who really pays the bills: "I think that what happens between agents and publishers too often is buddy-buddy. They vacation together and the agents forget for whom they work. And being out here you remember for whom you work."

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