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And the winner is . . .

September 11, 1997

Last week we asked our readers to comment on the five TV commercials nominated for the first-ever Emmy for advertising.

Two spots touted Levi Strauss' wide-leg jeans, while the other ads pitched General Motors' EV-1 electric car, the HBO cable channel and Nike, through paid endorser Tiger Woods.

The Academy of Television Arts and Sciences on Sunday awarded its first-ever commercial Emmy to the HBO ad. Created by New York agency BBDO, it showed chimps mouthing phrases they had learned while watching TV over the shoulder of scientist Dr. Jane Goodall.

Here's a sampling of your comments:

My vote goes to the General Motors EV-1 ad. Whenever it came on, all activity in our house stopped so everyone could watch it. It was so clever and the appliances were adorable!

Judith Garinger, El Segundo

The most entertaining ad had to be the HBO spot of the chimps. The timing and wry comedy is just classic. The least appealing is the Tiger Woods spot, because even though Tiger Woods is now world-renowned, other minorities can't play on those courses.

Phil Bolden, Inglewood

The winner should be the Levi Strauss "I Think I Love You" commercial. It is the best of the year. It is funny and cute and encapsulates a whole life in 30 seconds. It made me think of Levi's when I went shopping.

Julie Byers, Temple City

Thank you for the opportunity to express my enthusiasm for the exceptional EV-1 spot. It was beautiful, entertaining and surprisingly moving. As a kid, I always thought we'd be commuting in anti-gravitational vehicles. It's about time, as the commercial says, [that] "the electric car is here." If only they were affordable enough for us to respond with our wallets.

Regan Kibbee, Venice

The Levi Strauss ads represented the most intelligent and creative method of bringing a product into the public eye. The catchy songs allowed viewers not only to identify with the current times but, for a brief moment, to recall their own personal nostalgia, since the songs are about 20 years old. These feelings allow viewers to see these commercials in a positive light, which in turn creates positive advertising.

Michael Arjaev, Burbank

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