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Prosecute Fuhrman in the Court of Public Opinion

April 12, 1998|O.J. SIMPSON | O.J. Simpson lives in Los Angeles

We're now told that the Justice Department won't prosecute Mark Fuhrman for any of the crimes he may have committed with the Los Angeles Police Department. Allegations that he assaulted minorities while employed by the Police Department are blocked, not by a lack of evidence, but by the statute of limitations.

While Fuhrman cannot be prosecuted in the courts, he ought to be prosecuted in the court of public opinion. Therefore, I believe the LAPD and the Department of Justice should disclose Fuhrman's police records. The public needs a better understanding of police misconduct against minorities. The documents in his file may spur a debate relating to how an officer can have a file containing numerous complaints of misconduct against minorities and still be promoted through the ranks.

It is clear the LAPD has a dual standard. In my case, the police were quick to leak false information, lies and rumors to sway public opinion against me. However, when the LAPD had to deal with a situation against one of their own, such as two lawsuits against Fuhrman, they were quick to settle the cases to keep the files closed. Taxpayers were forced to pay for these settlements, though they were not even aware of the wrongs that were being redressed. This is not right.

Recently, the outrage of women's groups forced the LAPD to identify police officers guilty of domestic violence. Historically, these files had been closed to the public.

Minorities have been the victims of excessive force and unlawful arrest. They have the right to expect that police officers guilty of such misconduct under color of authority will not be permitted to continue patrolling the streets of Los Angeles.

Disclose the files. Failure to do so obstructs the truth, interferes with justice and encourages deception.

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