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BOOSTER SHOTS

Workout Mistakes

July 13, 1998|Martin Miller

Stretching seems to be the workout equivalent of flossing your teeth--everyone knows you should, but most people don't. Failing to stretch before and after an exercise (which reduces the risk of injury) is one of 10 common workout mistakes, according to the American Council on Exercise. Other gym no-no's include lifting too much weight; not drinking enough water; and leaning heavily on cardiovascular equipment, such as stair steppers. Probably the most common workout mistake was left off the list--never showing up at the gym.

Music Fit for the Fit

There's gospel aerobics, there's Jazzercize, and there's the constant pounding of the dance beat to motivate fitness enthusiasts to shape up. Now there are several gyms in Los Angeles, New York and other cities that offer live DJs so folks can hop, skip and jump to whatever tunes will move them. Wonder how many requests DJs get for Olivia Newton-John's "Let's Get Physical"?

Obese Sleep

It's common for anyone to feel drowsy after a big lunch, but obese people may feel that way more of the time, according to a new study. Obese people are much more likely than others to fall asleep during the daytime, say researchers at Pennsylvania State University. They say 57% of obese patients reported daytime sleepiness, compared with only 2% of those who are of normal weight. Researchers were stumped as to why obese people would feel sleepier than others.

No Slouching

Tired of someone always nagging you about your posture? Now for about $60, you can buy what its makers claim is a solution--the Spine Tuner. The device straps across your shoulder blades and vibrates every time you slouch. For lower-back problems, it also can be attached to your midsection and will shake when you try to lift something incorrectly. Apparently, you can wear it underneath or over clothing, in which case it's sure to be a conversation starter. For more information, call (888) 277-2001.

Pumping Iron

Most people think the value of weightlifting is that you can kick sand in someone's face at the beach with confidence. But according to an article in the August issue of Men's Fitness magazine, lifting weights twice a week has a number of other benefits beyond the merely cosmetic. It also improves the body's immune system, raises testosterone levels, helps prevent colon cancer, helps lower blood pressure and may improve memory. In that case, Arnold Schwarzenegger must have a near photographic memory.

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