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SHOWS FOR YOUNGSTERS AND THEIR PARENTS TOO

A game show of grammar and storytelling; a film about siblings on safari; a concert by young musicians

July 26, 1998|LEE MARGULIES | TIMES TELEVISION EDITOR

Mad Libs is coming to television. The popular parlor game, in which players offer up adjectives, nouns and verbs without knowing how they'll be used in a story, has been turned into a game show for the Disney Channel (Sunday at 5:45 p.m.). The competition will pit two teams of children and also will incorporate charades and stunts. For ages 9-11.

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Two children (Brooke Nevin, Cody Jones) accompany their father to Zimbabwe in Running Wild, a new adventure film (Showtime, Sunday at 7 p.m.). Gregory Harrison plays the dad, an observer with the United Nations International Wildlife Organization who is trying to combat elephant poaching. The movie was filmed in Africa. For ages 8 and up.

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The football season arrives a few weeks early when "The Wonderful World of Disney" repeats "Angels in the Endzone" (ABC, Sunday at 7 p.m.). Christopher Lloyd, who played an angel in the feature film "Angels in the Outfield," reprises his role here as he helps a struggling high school gridiron team coached by Paul Dooley. For the family.

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With R.L. Stine's "Goosebumps" already a big hit on Fox, ABC turns to the children's author for a half-hour special, "Ghosts of Fear Street" (ABC, Friday at 8:30 p.m.). It's about a family living in a very bizarre neighborhood. Just for starters, there's a man on the block who begins to look like a bug when he gets nervous. For ages 7 and up.

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Music from the movies is the theme of this year's concert by Disney's Young Musicians Symphony Orchestra (Disney Channel, Saturday at 7 p.m.). The performers are all between the ages of 8 and 12. For the family.

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Dana Delany, Abe Vigoda, Stacy Keach and Mark Hamill lend their voices to "Batman: Mask of the Phantasm," a 1993 animated film making its TV debut on the Cartoon Network (Saturday at 8 p.m.). The story has the Caped Crusader investigating a series of mobster deaths while his alter ego, Bruce Wayne, is dealing with an unexpected encounter with a woman he once loved. For ages 7-15.

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