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National Nutrition Month

Food Labels Sprinkled With Clarity Lite

March 16, 1998

Lite?

Low?

Lean?

Just what do all those words on food labels mean? A primer:

* Calorie Free: Less than 5 calories per serving.

* Light (Lite): One-third less calories or no more than half the fat of the higher-calorie, higher-fat version; or no more than half the sodium of the higher-sodium version.

* Fat Free: Less than 0.5 gram of fat per serving.

* Low Fat: Three grams of fat or less per serving.

* Reduced or Less Fat: At least 25% less fat per serving than the higher-fat version.

* Lean: Less than 10 grams of fat, four grams of saturated fat and 95 milligrams of cholesterol per serving.

* Extra Lean: Less than five grams of fat, two grams of saturated fat and 95 milligrams of cholesterol per serving.

* Low in Saturated Fat: One gram saturated fat or less per serving and not more than 15% of calories from saturated fatty acids.

* Cholesterol Free: Less than two milligrams of cholesterol and two grams or less of saturated fat per serving.

* Low Cholesterol: 20 milligrams of cholesterol or less and two grams of saturated fat or less per serving.

* Reduced Cholesterol: At least 25% less cholesterol than the higher-cholesterol version, and two grams (or less) of saturated fat per serving.

* Sodium Free (No sodium): Less than five milligrams of sodium per serving, and no sodium chloride (NaCl) in ingredients.

* Very Low Sodium: 35 milligrams of sodium or less per serving.

* Low Sodium: 140 milligrams of sodium (or less) per serving.

* Reduced or Less Sodium: At least 25% less sodium per serving than the higher-sodium version.

* Sugar Free: Less than 0.5 gram of sugar per serving.

* High Fiber: Five grams of fiber (or more) per serving.

* Good Source of Fiber: 2.5 to 4.9 grams of fiber per serving.

Source: The American Heart Assn. pamphlet "Facts About the New Food Label."

(BEGIN TEXT OF INFOBOX / INFOGRAPHIC)

Resources

* Food Allergy Network: (800) 929-4040. Web site: http://www.foodallergy.org.

* American Dietetic Assn. Nutrition hotline: (800) 366-1655 in English and Spanish. Web site: http://www.eatright.org.

* American Heart Assn.: (800) AHA-USA1. Web site: http://www.americanheart.org.

* American Diabetes Assn.: (213) 966-2890 serving California and Nevada. Web site: http://www.diabetes.org.

* Milk Processor Education Program: (800) WHY-MILK. Web site: http://www.whymilk.com.

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