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In Brief

Mouse Produces Elephant Eggs From Implanted Ovarian Tissue

November 05, 1998

In a discovery that could aid preservation of endangered species, Purdue University researchers have "tricked" a mouse into producing elephant eggs. Biologist John Critser and his colleagues implanted elephant ovarian tissue into female mice and found that the tissue produced healthy eggs. Such eggs could potentially be fertilized with elephant sperm and implanted in a female elephant. Elephant eggs, or oocytes, are about the same size as mouse oocytes.

Critser and his colleagues also reported in the most recent issue of Animal Production Science that ovarian tissue from mammals could be successfully frozen and stored at very low temperatures before being used to produce eggs.

Compiled by Times medical writer Thomas H. Maugh II

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