Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsTrial

To the Editor:

November 22, 1998

Abbie's legend has a life of its own by now and is surely beyond correction, but I can't help sending in a small correction to J. Hoberman's otherwise fine review of "Steal This Dream" (Book Review, October 11) and four other books about the '60 counterculture.

Contrary to the quotation from one observer, Abbie Hoffman did not ingest LSD "like cornflakes" every morning. I would estimate he took LSD about four times a year for three years during the late '60s. Also, Abbie never took acid or any other psychedelic during the Chicago conspiracy trial. It was Paul Krassner who was on acid during his testimony in that trial. Abbie and I were furious and didn't speak to Krassner for several years thereafter.

I think it's important to be accurate about this for the sake of young people who may be influenced. I continue to believe that psychedelics are a useful tool or sacrament for special occasions.

Anita Hoffman, Petaluma, Calif.

*

To the Editor:

For a book on Kurt Weill's theater works, to be published on Weill's centenary in 2000, I would be interested in hearing from anyone who saw an original production either in Germany or America.

Foster Hirsch

c/o Victoria Wilson

Alfred A. Knopf

201 E. 50th St.

New York, NY 10022.

*

To the Editor:

For an anthology on the ways people find marijuana beneficial (enhancing, therapeutic, recreational, et cetera) William Novak and I wish to hear from articulate users. Anonymity is available.

Lester Grinspoon

Harvard Medical School

74 Fenwood Rd.

Boston, Mass. 02115

*

To the Editor:

I am researching a book on Los Angeles architect Stiles Clements (1920-1955), who designed the Richfield Building, Samson Tyre Company (now The Citadel), Mayan Theater, El Capitan Theater and Hollywood Park Turf Club and would like to hear from anyone who worked with or personally knew Clements.

Tony Cifarelli

992 Pacific St.

Morro Bay, Ca. 93442

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|