Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBabies

BABY'S 1ST YEAR

Don't Try to Hurry Baby's Development

October 05, 1998|JEANNINE STEIN

Babies are fascinating creatures, changing remarkably from week to week, month to month. In the course of one year a baby develops from a squirming little bundle to a walking, talking child with a distinct personality.

This one-year timeline is a general guide for parents. Dr. Barbara Korsch, professor of pediatrics at Childrens Hospital in Los Angeles, and Dr. Edward McCabe, professor and executive chairman of pediatrics at UCLA Medical Center, have outlined major developmental stages: motor and language skills, improved eyesight and hearing, and relating to their environment.

But the range of what's normal is quite broad. Factors such as siblings, home environment and physical characteristics can affect a child's development. There's no need to panic if crawling happens one month before or after indicated here.

A child's development should happen naturally, Korsch says. While some parents may be eager to have their child be the next Mozart, pushing and overstimulation can be harmful.

(BEGIN TEXT OF INFOBOX / INFOGRAPHIC)

MONTH 1:

A baby can ...

See at close range. Smile, but not in direct response to anything. Lift head while lying down. Tightly grasp an object. "His most meaningful experience is being held," says Korsch, "and that way he can look at the parental face."

MONTH 2:

A baby can ...

Control neck and extremities better. Smile in response to stimulus. Raise head a little higher if placed on stomach. See greater distances and more color. Make a series of various sounds.

MONTH 3:

A baby can ...

Respond to an object coming toward her. Reach for familiar people and objects. Start cooing in long, musical sounds. Display better neck and upper chest control.

MONTH 4:

A baby can ...

Begin to roll from front to back. Orient toward a voice. Use both hands together instead of asymmetrically. Transfer objects from one hand to another. Laugh more.

MONTH 5:

A baby can ...

Sit with support. Roll from back to front. Orient toward a noise other than a voice.

MONTH 6:

A baby can ...

Use a raking motion to retrieve an object. Recognize familiar non-family members. Sit up without support. Go from cooing to repeating syllables. Baby may begin to creep, raising up on his front arms and dragging along the ground.

MONTHS 7-12:

A baby can ...

Walk while holding onto things like furniture, called "cruising." Understand simple commands, such as "No."

MONTH 7:

A baby can ...

Intensely inspect objects. Feed himself with his fingers.

MONTHS 8-9:

A baby can ...

Crawl. Start to say "dada" and "mama," although indiscriminately. As the parents reward the child for making those sounds, he begins to learn them as names.

MONTH 10:

A baby can ...

Start to imitate. Demonstrate improved motor skills by doing things such as placing an object in a cup. Baby may be able to say a couple words.

MONTH 11:

A baby can ...

Stand alone and may be able to drink from a cup.

MONTH 12:

A baby can ...

Begin to walk. Stoop and stand back up. Mark on paper with a pencil. Imitate more. Become more cooperative when getting dressed.

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|