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A consumer's guide to the best and worst of sports media and merchandise. Ground rules: If it can be read, played, heard, observed, worn, viewed, dialed or downloaded, it's in play here.

September 16, 1998|LARRY STEWART

What: Pay-per-view women's boxing on the Internet

Where: USSB and www.cbssportsline.com

When: Thursday at 6 p.m.

In this day and age of cutting-edge technology, it was bound to happen: pay-per-view sports on television and the Internet.

This is not the first sports event on the Internet, and televised women's boxing is not new either--Rolling Hills Estates promoter Rick Kulis has put four cards on cable television and three on pay-per-view over the past 16 months.

What's significant is that tonight's card from Biloxi, Miss., is the first pay-per-view sports event on the Internet.

If you have an 18-inch satellite dish system, you can get the card for $19.95 on U.S. Satellite Broadcasting's Channel 900. If you don't, it's available for $9.95 on the Internet at www.cbssportsline.com.

The price of the Internet telecast is less because the picture doesn't figure to be as good as the one on satellite television. The lower price also is designed to get people to try it.

Kulis, president of Event Entertainment, was a pioneer of pay-per-view boxing on cable television in the early 1980s, and now he's a pioneer of pay-per-view boxing on the Internet. Only in 1998, it's women's boxing.

Kulis got the idea, he said, because of all the hits he gets from all over the world on his women's boxing website, www.eventent.com. Kulis sold his idea to Ross Levinsohn, vice president in charge of acquisitions for CBS.

As for who's fighting on the card titled "Brawling Beauties," the main event has Joline "The Terminator" Blackshear of Rohnert Park, Calif., defending her International Female Boxing Assn. flyweight title against Delia Gonzalez of Chamberino, N.M. Blackshear is 3-1 with two knockouts and Gonzalez is 10-2-2 with three knockouts.

There are five other bouts on the card.

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