Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections

THE INSIDE TRACK | PAGE TWO / RANDY HARVEY

Mosley Puts Together a Marvelous Resume

April 15, 1999|RANDY HARVEY

Two Southern Californians are arguably the world's best pound-for-pound fighters.

You no doubt know one, Oscar De La Hoya.

You probably aren't as familiar with the other, Sugar Shane Mosley.

But Mosley, not De La Hoya, was the Boxing Writers Assn. of America fighter of the year in 1998 after five successful defenses--all by knockout or TKO--of the International Boxing Federation lightweight title he has held for 18 months.

The reason that De La Hoya became more famous is not hard to figure.

De La Hoya, the welterweight from East L.A., won an Olympic gold medal in 1992, signed with one of the sport's most influential promoters, Bob Arum, and immediately began fighting on national television.

Mosley, of Pomona, also fought in Barcelona in 1992 but failed to win a medal, signed with a lesser-known promoter and had to earn main-event status. He did that by going to New York and Philadelphia and becoming adopted as an East Coast fighter.

But Mosley (31-0) has been angling to fight again in California, and on Saturday night at the Fantasy Springs Casino in Indio, he will do that, defending his title against John Brown.

"He's comparable to Marvin Hagler, who fought 45 times before the public recognized him," says Larry Merchant, a commentator for the cable network, HBO, that will televise the fight along with the semi-main event between Ivan Robinson and Angel Manfredy.

De La Hoya has been compared to Sugar Ray Leonard because of his popularity. Stylistically, however, Mosley is the rightful heir to the nickname shared by Leonard and Sugar Ray Robinson.

*

For Kurt Rambis' NBA coaching career, the future is now. . . .

He deserves more time to develop a mastery of Xs and O's and game situations. . . .

But you would like to think that one of the most intense players in Laker history could inspire more passion in his team. . . .

Portland players seemed stunned Tuesday night by the Lakers' lack of urgency in transition from offense to defense. . . .

The Trail Blazers said they noted it while studying Laker game films, but they had to see it in person to believe it. . . .

Maybe the Laker players don't respect Rambis because of his unwillingness or lack of authority due to the owner's influence to slap Dennis Rodman with a punishment more severe than double-secret probation. . . .

So Rodman couldn't play the second half against the Trail Blazers because of pain in his elbow. What was it going to do, throw off his shooting touch? . . .

I'd like to take credit for that line. But it came courtesy of Larry Frisina of Bungalow News in Pasadena. . . .

Barring an injury, Paul Kariya will finish the regular season with the second-most shots in NHL history. He had 414 before the game against the Blues. . . .

It's doubtful anyone will ever catch the all-time leader, Phil Esposito, who took 550 shots in 1970-71 for Boston. . . .

That was the season bumper stickers began appearing in Boston that said, "Jesus Saves, But Espo Scores On The Rebound." . . .

King President Tim Leiweke says if he had arrived one week before the Wayne Gretzky trade in 1996--instead of one week after--he would have tried to talk The Great One into remaining in Los Angeles. . . .

"In retrospect, maybe that would have been a mistake," Leiweke says. "Now we're two years into our youth movement instead of just starting it." . . .

As for the players the Kings received from St. Louis in the Gretzky trade, Craig Johnson looked like a real find last season but was lost this season and Roman Vopat and Patrice Tardif have departed. . . .

But the two draft choices the Kings received from the Blues were used for players who are among their top junior prospects, Matt Zultek and Peter Hogan. . . .

Sprinter Ato Boldon will reveal his speed secrets in a clinic for middle school students Friday at 4 p.m. at Mt. San Antonio College's track in Walnut. . . .

He will then exhibit his speed Sunday in the 200 at the Mt. SAC Relays. . . .

Fox Sports' "Goin' Deep" segment about banned performance-enhancing drugs, hosted by Chris Myers and reported by Diana Nyad, was compelling. . . .

But they overlooked one angle. According to the current issue of Track & Field News, two birds were disqualified from the Swedish pigeon-racing championships in January after testing positive for cortisone.

*

While wondering if the Ducks shouldn't try to supplement the scoring of Teemu Selanne and Kariya with Gretzky, I was thinking: Verne Lundquist is the most underrated television announcer, the Lakers have taken underachieving to a new level, the Clippers are at least trying.

Randy Harvey can be reached at his e-mail address: randy.harvey@latimes.com.

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|