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| In Your Dreams

This Balcony Scene Is Troubling Him

May 04, 1999|CYNTHIA RICHMOND | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES

Dear Cynthia: I can't figure this dream out and can't put it out of my mind. It starts with me going onto a balcony. There are many people on the balcony, all looking to the west. I am dressed in a nightshirt and look down at my legs, which look very strong. Then the president comes out to the balcony and announces that bombers and missiles are on their way to destroy the U.S. I am really surprised and ask why. I am told that the rest of the world has united and is very aggressive in its intent to destroy the U.S., the last bastion of democracy.

TED

Via Internet

Dear Reader: Balconies offer a higher perspective, a place to look out at the view. Others are on your balcony as well; you don't feel alone in your perspective. Dressed in a nightshirt, you are caught in a resting mode: There may be a fear of sleeping through a dangerous situation. But your legs are strong: You can get away, or take a strong stand.

The west seems to represent the U.S. and democracy. Perhaps you feel a deep concern for the current involvement in Kosovo and the policies of the West. If that interpretation doesn't feel right, your dream may represent a more personal situation, a concern about being victimized by the actions of others in positions of authority.

*

Dear Cynthia: Any time I have a dream, it takes place in the home where I grew up (ages 10 through 25). But the people in the dream are from the present. Since leaving that house, I have lived in six different places, but my dreams never take place in any of those homes.

JAN

Via Internet

Dear Reader: Dreams that take place in a childhood home often reflect the principles we learned during those formative years. They can represent a desire for the security of our youth, when we had fewer responsibilities, or they can reflect dependence on our families. They also may refer to situations that took place at that time, and are resurfacing to be better understood from an adult perspective.

* Fax your dreams to Cynthia Richmond at (213) 237-0732 or e-mail them to in.your.dreams@worldnet.att.net. Please include your hometown and a daytime phone number. "In Your Dreams" appears every Tuesday and should be read for entertainment purposes only.

* Cynthia Richmond explains children's dreams on our Kids' Reading Room page every Wednesday.

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