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Chuck Jones' Latest Creation Will Prowl the Web

August 17, 2000|MICHELE BOTWIN | TIMES STAFF WRITER

Chuck Jones, the creative force behind such classic Looney Tunes cartoon characters as Road Runner, Wile E. Coyote, Pepe Le Pew and Marvin the Martian, has created a new animated character for the Web. The brainchild of the 87-year-old Jones, Timber Wolf will appear in a 13-episode online series on Warner Bros. Online and Entertaindom.com starting in late November. Joe Alasky will voice Timber Wolf, and Nancy Cartwright (who does the voice of Bart Simpson on "The Simpsons") will voice a squirrel character. The launch of the Web series is timed to the Nov. 21 release of a Warner Home Video biography of Jones, which will also air on PBS around Thanksgiving. Jones' last character created for Warner Bros., Michigan J. Frog, is the mascot for the WB Television Network.

Web to Film: Joe Roth's Revolution Studios will produce a feature based on "Lil' Pimp," an animated Web series created and produced by Peter Gilstrap and Mark Brooks for MediaTrip.com. The feature could become the first full-length theatrical release using the flash animation that is popular on the Internet. "Lil' Pimp," an off-kilter comedy about a cute redheaded kid who hangs out with his pimp friends, appears in weekly one-minute installments on MediaTrip, an entertainment Web site that serves as the Internet arm for the studio. Gilstrap and Brooks also create and produce the animated show "Creamburg" for MediaTrip and "Adventure Men" for iFuse.com.

Book to Web: "Etiquette for Outlaws," a book to be published in May by HarperCollins, has been optioned to a Web, film and TV deal by ezflix.com, the Internet division of Landscape Entertainment. The book, by Rob Cohen and David Wollock, covers "the manners that Miss Manners missed." Explained Wollock: "It's not about 'where to put the silverware' but 'where to put your first tattoo.' " Ezflix plans to produce four- to five-minute Webisodes based on the book. "We're hoping the Web will allow us to delve even deeper into certain illicit subjects that we were restricted from in print," Wollock said.

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