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THE INSIDE TRACK | MORNING BRIEFING

Shea Luxury Box Sounds Like Lincoln Bedroom

November 02, 2000|EARL GUSTKEY

According to the New York Post, Mayor Rudy Giuliani will have to account for World Series expenses with the Federal Election Commission.

"Giuliani's political action committee shelled out thousands of dollars to rent a luxury box at Shea Stadium for the Series," the Post's David Seifman wrote.

"The mayor referred questions about the expenditure to his political operatives, who refused to discuss it.

"But one source said he used the box, which holds 15 to 30 people, to accommodate major contributors to his aborted Senate race.

" 'It's all legal,' the source said. 'Someone raises $50,000 and asks for a Series ticket, do you tell him we can't get any?'

For the Record
Los Angeles Times Thursday November 9, 2000 Home Edition Sports Part D Page 2 Sports Desk 1 inches; 31 words Type of Material: Correction
Morning Briefing--A Nov. 2 item reporting that former USC running back Charles White is the Pacific 10 Conference's career leader in touchdowns was incorrect. Skip Hicks broke White's record in 1997 while playing for UCLA.

"Giuliani will have to disclose the cost in his next filing with the Federal Election Commission."

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Trivia time: Who is the career leader in Pacific 10 touchdowns?

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Baseball's best: Joel Sherman, in the New York Post, writing about Yankee Derek Jeter's spectacular postseason:

"Jeter's postseason put him in a position where you could argue that Jeter, not Alex Rodriguez, is the best player in baseball."

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Add Jeter: From Peter Gammons in the Boston Globe, after calling Jeter "one of the greatest players of all time," wrote of Met players being impressed that when Jose Vizcaino won Game 1 with a 12th-inning single, Jeter was the first man out of the Yankee dugout and the first to home plate.

"How many superstars are the first guy to home plate?" Met reliever Turk Wendell asked.

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Choker-chokee meeting? P.J. Carlesimo says he would like to have a quiet, private meeting with Latrell Sprewell, the onetime Golden State player who assaulted Carlesimo in 1997, when Carlesimo was the Warrior coach.

Carlesimo is a broadcaster with the San Antonio Spurs, and both were under the same roof at a recent exhibition game, but the two never even made eye contact.

It was the fourth time, the ex-coach said, they've been under the same roof since "The Choke" and have yet to talk.

"In a different setting, I'd like to talk to him," Carlesimo said. "Somewhere else where we could sit one on one in private and not have cameras."

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In case you missed it: John Robinson's Nevada Las Vegas football team, in a 43-40 overtime loss at Mississippi on Saturday, had 378 rushing yards--the third time UNLV (4-4) has run for more than 300 yards this season.

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Get serious: NCAA spokesman Wally Renfro, bashing the argument that legalizing college sports gambling in Nevada could be a deterrent to game-fixing by alerting authorities to unusual betting patterns:

"If that was valid, wouldn't we run legal crack houses to see if we could determine where the crack was coming from?"

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Misses his mutts: Met Manager Bobby Valentine, talking to the New York Post about wanting a new contract to buy a home in the New York area:

"I'm 50 years old. I'm very tired of renting an apartment and not having my dogs and my family with me all year. I can guarantee you that. Very tired."

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Trivia answer: USC's Charles White, 53.

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And finally: From the Boston Globe's Ron Borges, who spotted William "Refrigerator" Perry's 1986 Super Bowl ring on the eBay auction block recently:

"The highest bid was just over $14,000. It was the biggest Super Bowl ring ever made, one so big you can pass a half-dollar coin through it. It was 18-carat solid gold with 26 diamonds."

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