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76ers' Iverson Apologizes for Rap Lyrics About Gays and Women

October 06, 2000|From Associated Press

Allen Iverson apologized Thursday to gays and women who might be offended by the lyrics on his new rap album.

The album by the Philadelphia 76er star, "Non-Fiction," has been criticized in newspapers, and discussion about it has dominated sports radio shows. Though fellow hip-hop artists and rap-music critics say Iverson's lyrics are typical of the music style, columnists and radio hosts have criticized Iverson's lyrics for giving the team a bad reputation and presenting a poor image for fans.

"If individuals of the gay community and women of the world are offended by any of the material in my upcoming album, let the record show that I wish to extend a profound apology," Iverson said in a statement.

"If a kid thinks that I promote violence by the lyrics of my songs, I beg them not to buy it or listen to it. I want kids to dream and to develop new dreams."

The album is due out in February; an edited version of one rap, "40 Bars," will be released to radio stations Tuesday. The song is peppered with references to women, blacks and gays and contains the following lyric: "Man enough to pull a gun, be man enough to squeeze it." The song ends with the lyrics played over the sounds of a gun being cocked and fired.

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Vernon Maxwell was waived by the New York Knicks. . . . Veteran forward Terry Mills was signed by the Indiana Pacers. . . . Washington signed forward Harvey Grant, a first-round pick by the Wizards in 1988 who last played for Philadelphia during the 1998-99 season. . . . The Miami Heat signed free agents Mario Bennett, a former Laker and Clipper, and Ike Nwankwo, who played at UCLA and Long Beach State. . . . Wilt Chamberlain's 100-point basketball is up for bids again. The controversial ball is the centerpiece of the two-day Leland's Dynasties Auction and the sellers are certain it is from the game when Chamberlain scored 100 points on March 2, 1962.

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