Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA / A news summary

LAX Alters Procedures on Small Planes

October 17, 2000

WESTCHESTER — The Federal Aviation Administration said Monday that it has temporarily suspended a controversial air traffic control procedure blamed for two safety incidents involving jetliners and small planes recently at Los Angeles International Airport.

Under the procedure, small private planes were allowed to fly along the airport shoreline at an altitude of 2,500 feet. When a small plane was crossing, large jets taking off over the ocean would be ordered to stay at 2,000 feet to avoid collisions. At all other times, large jets were able to climb to 3,000 feet without restriction.

Those shifting takeoff procedures confused controllers and pilots, nearly causing a collision between a Piper and an Airbus A310 on Sept. 26, and prompting the panicked pilot of a small plane to go into a steep dive Oct. 4, apparently fearing he was about to be hit by a Boeing 777.

FAA spokesman Jerry Snyder said small planes will now be rerouted to fly at altitudes between 3,500 and 4,000 feet when crossing the shoreline. That would eliminate any potential conflict with jets climbing to 3,000 feet.

The change will be in effect for 90 days while an FAA review panel considers permanent revisions.

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|