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FALL SNEAKS

Quick Cuts Sneaks Edition

September 10, 2000|KEVIN CRUST

THE FUTURE IS NOW

Once ejected from "Late Night With David Letterman" for nearly kicking the lanky host in the head, the eccentric Crispin Glover can be seen this fall in two new films, "Nurse Betty," which opened Friday, and "Charlie's Angels" (Nov. 3). Glover, who's best known for playing Michael J. Fox's dad in "Back to the Future," was last on screen in 1996's "The People Vs. Larry Flynt." The mercurial actor has worked with a wide range of directors, from Hollywood stalwarts Robert Zemeckis and Oliver Stone to European expatriates Milos Forman, Lasse Halstrom and John Boorman; Glover's distinctiveness has also made him a favorite of mavericks David Lynch, Jim Jarmusch and Gus Van Sant.

SAME TIME, THIS YEAR

Oscar-winner Ellen Burstyn ("Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore") is featured prominently in two fall releases, "The Yards" and "Requiem for a Dream," both opening Oct. 13. (She can also be seen in Warner Bros.' Sept. 22 re-release of "The Exorcist.") Burstyn plays two long-suffering women: Mark Walhberg's working-class mom in "The Yards," and a widow whose addiction to diet pills mirrors her son's drug habit in the nightmarish "Requiem." The versatile actress, after serving an apprenticeship on Broadway and studying at the Actors Studio, reached stardom by reeling off five Academy Award-nominated performances between 1971 ("The Last Picture Show") and 1980 ("Resurrection"). This is no comeback, however, as the actress has worked continuously, accumulating more than 30 film and television credits in the '90s, including "Playing by Heart," "Spitfire Grill" and "How to Make an American Quilt." Burstyn also co-stars in the television series "That's Life" this fall on CBS.

THE CHURCH LADY'S NOT GOING TO BE HAPPY

What with Elizabeth Hurley playing the Devil in "Bedazzled" (Oct. 20) and Mira Sorvino turning up as Death in the upcoming "Too Tired to Die," things are looking up for the underworld. In addition to looking better, the dark side will get funnier with the arrival of "Little Nicky" (Nov. 10) featuring Adam Sandler as, oh, I don't know, the son of Satan, perhaps.

DON'T YOU FUGGEDABOUT ME

If you're having trouble waiting patiently for the third season of "The Sopranos," there's an independent film due Oct. 6 that might whet your appetite. "Two Family House," written and directed by Raymond De Felitta, places three of the HBO series' supporting songbirds in the limelight: Michael Rispoli (who, as Jackie Aprile, died in season one of "The Sopranos"), Katherine Narducci (Artie Bucco's wife) and Vincent Pastore (Salvatore "Pussy" Bompensiero). The movie won the audience award for drama at January's Sundance Film Festival, and was cast by Sheila Jaffe and Georgianne Walken, who won Emmys last year for their work on . . . "The Sopranos." It's good to know people.

DOC 'N' ROLL

A veritable rock 'n' roll festival plays local movie theaters this autumn. Besides the fictionalized bands Stillwater, in Cameron Crowe's "Almost Famous" (Sept. 13), and Spinal Tap, in "This Is Spinal Tap" (playing through Thursday at the Nuart), a plethora of real rock bands will come to town via the big screen. Starting back on Sept. 1, with the re-release of the Rolling Stones' "Gimme Shelter," a total of five concert films/documentaries are on tap. On Sept. 29, Phish is featured at the Nuart in "Bittersweet Motel," which highlights the group's gratefully deadicated following. That same day, Jason Priestley's rock doc "Barenaked in America," which captures his fellow Canadians the Barenaked Ladies on the road, joins the Shooting Gallery series at the Beverly Center. The self-explanatory "Rage: 20 Years of Punk Rock West Coast Style" and "Songs for Cassavetes," featuring the band Sleater-Kinney among others, open later in the fall.

MEETING THE PARENTS--TIP NO. 1

In "Meet the Parents," Ben Stiller tries to make a good impression on his intimidating prospective father-in-law played by Robert De Niro. It's a good idea to have an icebreaker when meeting your significant other's forebears. Try it in the form of a gift. Today's generation of parents came of age in the '60s and '70s, think herbal. If it turns into a business relationship, all the better. See "American Beauty" (1999) for details.

MEETING THE PARENTS--TIP NO. 2

It's only natural to be nervous. Just remember: It's tuck, then zip. See "There's Something About Mary" (1998) for details.

MEETING THE PARENTS--TIP NO. 3

Embrace diversity. Don't hold it against them if both parents are white. It's not their fault. See "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner" (1967) for details.

MEETING THE PARENTS--TIP NO. 4

So what if they serve you ham? Remember your manners. You're an atheist, not a vegetarian. See "Annie Hall" (1977) for details.

MEETING THE PARENTS--TIP NO. 5

The mother may be very attractive. She may even seem to be coming on to you. Resist the temptation. See "The Graduate" (1967) for details.

MEETING THE PARENTS--TIP NO. 6

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