Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections

YOUR MONEY WEEKEND

Financial Planner

September 29, 2000|LIZ PULLIAM WESTON

Checklist: Digital Signatures

A new federal law authorizing digital signatures takes effect Sunday, and you might notice the effects fairly soon. Businesses will be able to provide legally required notices by e-mail instead of regular mail if you agree to the change, and digital contracts for transactions such as buying insurance or securing a mortgage are likely to become more common. Here's what you should know about the new law, including some tips from Consumers Union:

* It's your choice: A business can't force you to accept electronic notification in lieu of a paper notice, and certain urgent matters--utility shut-offs, foreclosures, evictions-- still require a paper notice.

* Check your e-mail system: If you want to switch to e-mail notification, make sure you use an e-mail address you check daily, and one that won't block or filter out messages from the business with whom you have consented to accept electronic notifications.

* Look for fees: The new law allows businesses to charge you a fee if you decide to revert to paper notices after giving e-mail notices a try. Consumers Union suggests you not agree to e-mail notices in the first place if you'll later be charged a fee to switch back.

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|