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February 26, 2001|LARRY STEWART

What: "Real Sports With Bryant Gumbel"

Where: HBO, tonight, 9:30

The Pasadena police might want to check out this edition of "Real Sports." One of the four stories deals with the mysterious death of Kentucky Derby-winning jockey Chris Antley in Pasadena on Dec. 2. Police ruled the death was the result of a drug overdose, but friends of Antley tell HBO that they believe it was a homicide.

Antley's widow, Natalie Jowett, is interviewed by Jim Lampley. Jowett, a producer for ABC Sports, met Antley at last year's Kentucky Derby and says it was love at first sight. "It was like being struck by lightning," she said. Marriage came after a brief courtship, but Jowett remained in New York and Antley in Pasadena.

"There were many important things about him that I didn't know," she says. "Spending time with him, which we really didn't do until we got married, Chris revealed himself to me in ways that were shocking, sometimes very painful."

Jowett says she learned after the marriage that Antley was manic-depressive.

Antley was popular among the horse racing set and his best friend was jockey Gary Stevens, who is also interviewed. Stevens says he does not believe Antley's death was the result of a drug overdose. Friend Kathy Park, who discovered the body, says it was a homicide, and so does another female friend identified only as Corey.

Stevens says, "Chris felt that someone or some people were after him and he wouldn't relay to me who that was."

Pasadena police Commander Mary Schander defends her department and the handling of the case.

Also on this edition of "Real Sports" is a profile of Dallas Maverick owner Mark Cuban and a look at major league umpires who lost their jobs in 1999. The other story is about Rutgers women's basketball Coach Vivian Stringer.

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