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SNEAKS 2001: SPRING

Monkey See . . . the Year Ahead

January 21, 2001

About Adam. Stuart Townsend seems like the perfect man to Dublin singer Kate Hudson--and the rest of her family has a hard time resisting him too. (Miramax)

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All Access. Imax goes backstage and onstage at mega-concerts featuring Carlos Santana, Sting, George Clinton, Moby, Kid Rock and many others. (Imax)

For the Record
Los Angeles Times Wednesday January 24, 2001 Home Edition Calendar Part F Page 2 Entertainment Desk 1 inches; 30 words Type of Material: Correction
Writing credit--The writing team listed for the film "Texas Rangers" was incorrect in last weekend's Sunday Calendar capsules previewing the year's movies. Scott Busby & Martin Copeland received final credit.
For the Record
Los Angeles Times Sunday January 28, 2001 Home Edition Calendar Page 2 Calendar Desk 1 inches; 25 words Type of Material: Correction
Writing credit--The writing team listed for the film "Texas Rangers" was incorrect in the Jan. 21 Sunday Calendar Sneaks. Scott Busby & Martin Copeland received final credit.
For the Record
Los Angeles Times Sunday February 4, 2001 Home Edition Calendar Page 2 Calendar Desk 1 inches; 22 words Type of Material: Correction
Film locale--"The Long Run," a film about an ultra-marathoner, takes place in South Africa. The location was incorrect in the Jan. 21 Calendar Sneaks list.

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Beautiful Creatures. Rachel Weisz and Susan Lynch in the story of two women trying to turn the tables on the problematic men in their lives--and to abscond with a small fortune. (Universal Focus)

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Better Housekeeping. The battle of the sexes escalates to dangerous levels in writer-director Frank Novak's account of a disintegrating marriage. (Shooting Gallery)

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Better Than Sex. The principals in a torrid liaison begin to sense something beyond the erotic in this Australian entry. (IDP Distribution)

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Blow Dry. The national hair championships invade the small, working-class British city of Keighley. (Miramax)

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Born Romantic. Three London men (David Morrissey, Jimi Mistry and Craig Ferguson) search for love, to the backdrop of a salsa beat. (United Artists)

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Bread and Roses. Ken Loach's first film shot in the U.S. is the story of a labor action by Los Angeles janitors. (Lions Gate)

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Bridget Jones' Diary. Renee Zellweger plays the opinionated young Englishwoman, with Hugh Grant and Colin Firth as the two men in her tumultuous life. (Miramax)

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The Brothers. Bill Bellamy, Morris Chestnut, D.L. Hughley and Shemar Moore play lifelong friends negotiating life and love together. (Screen Gems)

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Bullfighter. Willem Dafoe, Michelle Forbes, Donnie Wahlberg and Olivier Martinez in a tale of good versus evil, set in the Mexican desert. (Phaedra)

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The Caveman's Valentine. Samuel L. Jackson, a brilliant musician who lives on the fringes, turns unlikely detective when he finds a frozen corpse. (Universal Focus)

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The Center of the World. Director Wayne Wang reunites with "Smoke" and "Blue in the Face" co-writer Paul Auster to trace a workaholic man's Las Vegas escapade. (Artisan)

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Cheaters. Writer-director Andrew Gurland ("Frat House" ) follows four friends scamming their way through the school system. Mary Tyler Moore plays the principal. (New Line)

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Chopper. The saga of a hood obsessed with being remembered as a legendary criminal. (First Look)

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The Circle. Three women struggle against the restrictions on their gender in Iran. (Winstar Cinema)

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Crazy/Beautiful. Rich kid Kirsten Dunst strikes up a romance with a boy (Jay Hernandez) who is bused from East L.A. to the Pacific Palisades high school. (Touchstone)

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Crocodile Dundee in Los Angeles. Mrs. D. (Linda Kozlowski) comes to La La Land to head a newspaper bureau, accompanied by her husband (Paul Hogan) and their son (Serge Cockburn). (Paramount)

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The Day I Became a Woman. A study of three generations of Iranian women confined to their homes by restrictive traditions. (Shooting Gallery)

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Deuces Wild. Zeroes in on a Brooklyn gang in 1958, a year when old ways were changing in new, turbulent times. (United Artists)

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The Dish. The reception of pictures of the first moon landing depends on a group of eccentric Australian scientists and their remote satellite dish. Based on a true story. (Warner Bros.)

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Double Deception. Stand-ins, multiple kidnappings and elaborate ruses propel a story centered on the daughter of a Japanese businessman in Los Angeles. (Phaedra)

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Driven. Renny Harlin directs Sylvester Stallone's script about rpm's and romance in the world of high-tech auto racing. Stallone stars with Burt Reynolds and Kip Pardue. (Warner Bros.)

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Eureka. A bus driver and two students struggle to come to terms with the brutal killing spree they survived. (Shooting Gallery)

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Exit Wounds. Maverick Detroit police detective Steven Seagal and mysterious crime lord DMX join forces against a sinister conspiracy. (Warner Bros.)

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The Fast and the Furious. Vin Diesel and Paul Walker star in an adventure about street-racing gangs in Los Angeles. (Universal)

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Festival in Cannes. Anouk Aimee and Maximilian Schell head the cast of Henry Jaglom's look at goings-on at the Cannes Film Festival. (Rainbow Film Co./Revere Entertainment)

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15 Minutes. New York homicide detective Robert De Niro and arson investigator Edward Burns pursue two rampaging killers, a chase that generates media madness. (New Line)

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The Forsaken. Don't pick up hitchhikers, especially if they turn out to be vampire hunters. Kerr Smith should have followed that old rule on his cross-country drive. (Screen Gems)

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Gabriela. Seidy Lopez ("Mi Vida Loca") stars with Jaime Gomez in a love story set in a mental health clinic. (Power Point Films)

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Get Over It. High schooler Ben Foster copes with being dumped. Also features Kirsten Dunst, Melissa Sagemiller. (Miramax)

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Ghost World. Thora Birch and Scarlett Johansson play high school friends in an adaptation of the comic book series. (United Artists)

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The Glass House. Orphaned teenager Leelee Sobieski has her doubts about new guardians Diane Lane and Stellan Skarsgard in this psychological thriller. (Columbia)

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