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March Planting Guide

March 03, 2001|JULIE BAWDEN DAVIS

There is a lot going on in the garden this month. The weather tends to remain chilly, so cool-season vegetables still thrive. The days are also lengthening, which makes it a good time to start some warm-season crops.

If you can't find warm-season vegetable plants in the nursery yet, start them from seed.

Planting flower seed now widens the selection of flowers you can grow and ensures that you'll get blooms in spring and summer.

It often works best to start most seedlings in containers and transplant after a few weeks when they are 2 or 3 inches high and the weather is warmer. Always wait four to seven days after rain before planting in the garden. You want the soil to be moist, but never soggy.

FLOWERS

Alyssum

Bachelor's button

Begonia

Bromeliad

Calendula

California poppy

Candytuft

Cineraria

Columbine

Dahlia

Delphinium

Dianthus

Forget-Me-Not

Foxglove

Fuchsia

Geranium

Ginger

Gladioli

Iceland poppy

Impatiens

Kalanchoe

Flowering kale

Larkspur

Love-in-a-mist

Love-in-puff

Lupine

Nasturtium

Nemesia

Oxalis

Pansy

Penstemon

Queen Ann's lace

Salvia

Schizanthus

Snapdragon

Society garlic

Statice

Stock

Viola

Violet

Wildflowers

VEGETABLES and HERBS

Artichoke

Arugula

Snap bean

Beet

Bok choy

Brussels sprout

Cabbage

Carrot

Cauliflower

Celery

Chives

Cilantro

Collards

Corn (early variety)

Cucumber

Dill

Eggplant

Endive

Kale

Kohlrabi

Leek

Lettuce

Mint

Mushroom

Mustard greens

Onion

Parsley

Parsnip

Pea

Pepper

Radish

Rutabaga

Salad burnet

Salsify

Shallot

Spinach

Squash

Strawberry

Summer squash

Swiss chard

Tomato (early variety)

Turnip

TREES, VINES and BUSHES

Avocado

Azalea

Blueberry

Camellia

Citrus

Jasmine

Loquat

Macadamia

Wisteria

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