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An L.A. Divided Can't Stand

April 27, 2002

It seems as if Los Angeles could be the first major city in America to be dismantled by apathy. A small coterie of essentially unknown Valley individuals, with God knows what real motivations (my guess is that it's a West Valley tax cut scheme), have plotted--and made alarming progress--to rip the city of Los Angeles in half. And nobody save The Times is talking about it or seems to care (editorial, April 20).

Imagine if a small group of eastern Queens residents decided that they wanted to break the borough away from New York City. Or some South Side Chicago group wanted to split from the city. It's not difficult to imagine the uproar from proud New Yorkers or Chicagoans; they would run them out of town on a rail. Here in Los Angeles, not only is this ridiculous notion not met with outrage, it's taken seriously and may appear on a ballot.

If the residents of L.A. harbor so much apathy and disdain for their city that they do vote to break it up, if they want to take the destructive step of creating a new city (one that is built out, complete and will not change one iota) instead of focusing their energies on improving the one that exists, then they'll get what they deserve. And one of the truly remarkable cities in the world will be the victim.

Eddie Dunlop

Los Angeles

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Will I be better off if the Valley and/or Hollywood secede from Los Angeles? My answer is no. I would lose my ability to make reservations on many of the present L.A. city Recreation and Parks Department golf courses and the ability to take advantage of the L.A. resident senior golf discount. Also, the time to receive reserved books from the L.A. Public Library would be increased, since fewer library branches would be a source for these items.

Henry Pinczower

Los Angeles

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The San Fernando Valley cannot afford to go independent. That means we will be burdened with increased taxes, yet another layer of bureaucracy, more office seekers and the same old creaky services. Oh yes, and alimony to Los Angeles.

Valley secession has been a fantasy for as long as I can remember. The reason it has stayed a pipe dream is that it makes no sense and offers no benefits. Instead, why not make the Valley a semi-autonomous division of the city? It would have a vice mayor, and Valley members of the L.A. City Council could act independently on Valley matters.

Jerry Buck

Sherman Oaks

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