Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections

Revolving Door to Private Riches

April 29, 2002

In writing about President Bush's advisor Karen Hughes being able to hit the jackpot after going through the revolving door of government and the private sector, Matt Miller said, in part, "Conservatively, we're closing in on $1 million a year. Now let's be clear: There is nothing wrong with this'' ("Hughes Has It All--and More,'' Commentary, April 25). Nothing wrong? While it is true that there is nothing illegal about the speaking fees and directorships he outlined, "wrong" is another matter altogether. At its core, this is just another form of influence-peddling.

Hughes will not be asked to speak because of her charming wit or to serve as a director for her great insight into a particular industry. People will pay her big bucks only to get the ear of President Bush. And they are not the people who want to advance "good policy,'' they are the ones who have "special interests.'' So, I say there is plenty wrong for her to collect 30 times the salary of a teacher or a social worker who will work much harder and contribute a lot more to the general welfare.

Toby Gottfried

Santa Ana

*

What did Miller read that I didn't? All that I could see is that a person chose living in her home state of Texas over living in Washington. I didn't see that she considered it a sacrifice to leave a powerful position, simply that she could do nicely without it. As one who has declined better opportunities necessitating leaving the paradise that is Los Angeles, I can only applaud her decision (April 24).

A.C. Davies

Marina del Rey

*

It's such a big deal that Hughes gives up her position of power because her husband and son whine about being homesick--like that would ever happen if the tables were turned. The issue not covered is that employers of all sorts could accommodate men and women balancing their professional and personal obligations if they would get over their control issues. Technology is such that many people could do at least part of their job--and for many most of their job--from home or at hours that would suit their other obligations. Hughes can do most of her job from her home with computer, fax, video conferencing and maybe one day a week in Washington--there's no reason for her to quit.

Zelda McKay

Manhattan Beach

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|