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SUNDAY REPORT

As History Repeats Itself, the Scholar Becomes the Story

Doris Kearns Goodwin's highly public life has taken many turns. Questions of plagiarism--and how it is defined--are just one chapter.

August 04, 2002|PETER H. KING | TIMES STAFF WRITER

An examination of "No Ordinary Time" against other texts has turned up what appear to be parallel language usage and similarly constructed sentences.

"The rumor buzzed through the White House that she would finally be going with the President on something important, and some of us speculated that with the sea air and the romance of the high seas, maybe they would finally share the same bed."

Lillian Rogers Parks,

with Frances Spatz Leighton

"The Roosevelts," p. 261

*

"The White House buzzed with rumors, if Lillian Parks' memory is to be trusted, that Eleanor 'would finally be going with the President on something important'; the maids speculated that, with the sea air and the romance of the high seas, the president and first lady would become intimate once again."

Doris Kearns Goodwin,

p. 573, footnote,

"would finally be going."

*

"FDR had made it a rule, during his first campaign for governor, that photographers were not to take pictures of him looking crippled or helpless.... It was an unspoken code, honored by the White House photography corps. If, as happened once or twice, one of its members sought to violate it and try to sneak a picture of the President in his chair, one or another of the older photographers would 'accidentally' knock the camera to the ground or otherwise block the picture."

Hugh Gregory Gallagher,

"FDR's Splendid Deception," p. 94

*

"There was an unspoken code of honor on the part of the White House photographers that the president was never to be photographed looking crippled.... If, as occasionally happened, one of the members of the press corps sought to violate the code by sneaking a picture of the president looking helpless, one of the older photographers would 'accidentally' block the shot or gently knock the camera to the ground."

Goodwin,

p. 587, footnote "accidentally."

"It was the first time that he had used his braces in many months.... During the year since he last stood on his braces, he had lost considerable weight; as a result the braces no longer fitted him."

Samuel I. Rosenman,

"Working With Roosevelt," p. 461

*

"This was the first time in months he had used his braces. Because of all the weight he had lost, they no longer fitted him properly, so that he had difficulty keeping his balance."

Goodwin,

p. 537, speech in Bremerton: Samuel I. Rosenman

*

Researchers Norma Kaufman and Jane E. King contributed to this report.

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