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BEST BETS: Sunday 2/3

7pm Music

January 31, 2002

7pm Music

American baritone and international opera star Thomas Hampson makes a rare Southern California appearance, in recital with pianist Wolfram Rieger, at Royce Hall. The program features music by Schubert and Mahler, folk songs and songs based on poems by Walt Whitman.

Thomas Hampson, Royce Hall, UCLA, 4 p.m. $25 to $40. (310) 825-2101.

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2pm Family

Music hath charms.... The Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra's Family Concert series opens with "Tyrannosaurus Sue," Bruce Adolphe's musical story about a T. rex who inspires kids to discover not only the world of dinosaurs but also concert music. Adolphe will conduct and narrate. Pre-concert activities include an "instrument petting zoo" and a show-and-tell with replica dinosaur bones and crafts by the Natural History Museum of L.A. County.

"Tyrannosaurus Sue," Alex Theatre, 216 N. Brand Blvd., Glendale, 2 p.m.; pre-concert activities, 1 p.m. $7.50 to $12.50. (213) 622-7001, Ext. 215.

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all day Movies

The intensity that Al Pacino is so well known for in his 30-year-plus film career is on display in two roles that find him on opposite sides of the law. First up, Pacino plays an undercover cop who blows the whistle on police corruption in Sidney Lumet's 1973 drama "Serpico." Based on Peter Maas' nonfiction book and adapted by Waldo Salt and Norman Wexler, the film confirmed stardom for Pacino, who lets us watch a man undergoing changes, from the idealistic (but not really naive) rookie to the embattled loner whose sin is that he refused to take his cut of the precinct's monthly collections. In "Scarface," Brian DePalma's 1983 remake of the Howard Hawks-Ben Hecht gangster classic, Pacino growls through his role as a drug-smuggling Cuban refugee living la vida loca in Miami. Oliver Stone wrote the screenplay, a savage inversion of the American dream.

Al Pacino double feature, New Beverly Cinema, 7165 Beverly Blvd., L.A. "Serpico," Sunday, 1:30 and 7 p.m.; Monday and Tuesday, 7 p.m. "Scarface," Sunday, 3:55 and 9:25 p.m.; Monday and Tuesday, 9:25 p.m. $3 to $6. (323) 938-4038.

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1pm Family

From ballads and peace anthems to hip-hop and dance rhythms, the colorful Los Angeles-based Children of the World chorus will lift its collective voice in its first solo family concert. Founded by concert pianist and composer Marrina Waks, the group of 150 young singers, ages 5 to 18, released its first CD last year; it has been crooning its pop-style messages of global unity and tolerance regularly at world sports events and high-profile national charity and political events since 1992.

Children of the World in Concert, Beverly Hills Library Auditorium, 444 N. Rexford Drive, Beverly Hills, 1 p.m. Free. (310) 285-9791.

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all day Art

"Great British Paintings From American Collections: Holbein to Hockney" covers nearly 500 years of British artists and art movements, from Thomas Gainsborough to Lucien Freud, from 18th century portraits to contemporary landscapes. The 65-piece exhibition, opening Sunday at the Huntington Library and co-organized by the Yale Center for British Art, also will spotlight American collectors Henry E. Huntington and Paul Mellon as well as paintings by Anthony van Dyck, J.M.W. Turner and Francis Bacon, among others.

"Great British Paintings From American Collections: Holbein to Hockney," Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens, 1151 Oxford Road, San Marino. Curator Malcolm Warner will present a free lecture on the exhibition at 2:30 p.m. in Friends' Hall. Tuesdays through Fridays, noon to 4:30 p.m.; Saturdays and Sundays, 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Ends May 26. Adults, $10; seniors, $8.50; students, $7; children younger than 12, free. (626) 405-2100.

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