Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections

Mideast: No Security Without Morality

June 14, 2002

Re "Palestinian Reforms Needed for Peace Talks, Bush Says," June 11: It's part of his political game, and America had better wise up about it. I'm talking about every time Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon invades Palestinian territories and then runs to pay President Bush a visit. Every time he does that, other countries must feel that America supports Sharon's invasion, as he comes here to get a pat on the back for it. America should not allow Sharon to use us as a pawn in his own war with the Palestinians.

And if President Bush doesn't put a stop to it, he's only fueling the war on terrorism with his own politics. It's making me wonder what's really on the Bush agenda. Fighting terrorism or pleasing his conservative voters? He can't do both with his current agenda.

Sue Doyle

Los Angeles

*

Tracy Wilkinson brought back memories of when I was 11 ("In Growing Numbers, Palestinian Boys Are Choosing the Brief Life of a 'Martyr,' " June 10). In 1947, another nonnative occupying army was in Palestine. The British had divided Jerusalem in three sections: A, B and C. We lived in C.

Unlike the 11- and 14-year-old boys of today, I had no interest in or even knowledge of being a "martyr." Instead, I would go up to the British soldiers and ask them if I could see what was inside their tank. And what a grand tour I got! Today, on the other hand, Israel is creating its own unconquerable enemy. It has made the Palestinians so crushed, so desperate, so humiliated and so nonhuman that they have nothing to lose now, not even their young lives.

Basim Zacharia

Las Vegas

*

Re "Arafat, by Feeding on Martyrdom, Dooms His People," Commentary, June 11: Robert Scheer says Yasser Arafat has got to go! Mr. Scheer, Sharon has got to go!

Jack Corkery

San Clemente

*

Re "Backward Steps for Mideast," editorial, June 12: Instead of urging President Bush to "get back on track to a plan that promises security for both sides," The Times should be emphasizing the need for a realistic plan that will indeed produce security for both sides. Until Palestinian suicide bombers and their surviving relatives stop receiving moral and financial support from influential Palestinian groups and neighboring Arab states--and until they abandon policies that will effectively destroy Israel as a Jewish state--promises for security and peace are a pipe dream. Three cheers for Bush, who seems to recognize this.

Marcus Jacobson

Los Angeles

*

It was most gratifying to read Dina Khayat's "Peace Happens" (Opinion, June 9) and to know that she is a member of the executive board of the Cairo Peace Movement. Many Israelis who have been sensitive to the Palestinians' suffering and willing to accommodate their aspirations are often asked if they know any Arabs or Palestinians who are as sympathetic to Israelis' suffering or at least show some understanding of the Israeli side. The answer is often a perplexing "no."

Now, thanks to Khayat, who quite genuinely supports coexistence and its benefits for both sides, one can hope to hear more voices like that to promote more mutual understanding.

Yona Sabar

Los Angeles

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|