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WORLD CUP QUARTERFINALS * GERMANY 1, U.S. 0

Not All Is Lost for U.S.

Soccer: Tested throughout, Germany and goalkeeper Kahn work hard to make Ballack's goal in 39th minute stand up as Americans walk away with a measure of satisfaction.

June 22, 2002|GRAHAME L. JONES | TIMES STAFF WRITER

Berhalter lunged at a corner kick and Kahn had to get down low to his right to block the shot. The ball almost went over the line, rebounded back up and hit Germany's Torsten Frings, who was standing at the left post, on the arm before being cleared.

The U.S. players appealed for a hand-ball call, but there was no foul involved because Frings had his arm down at his side and made no move to play the ball.

Arena sent Mathis on in place of McBride, Cobi Jones on in place of Lewis and, finally, Earnie Stewart on in place of Mastroeni, but the Germans withstood the pressure.

The final U.S. chance came in the 89th minute when Jones crossed the ball and Sanneh's header slammed into the side netting, bringing a gasp from the crowd.

It was a last gasp, however, and the final whistle brought both the game and the Americans' 2002 World Cup saga to a close.

"It's been incredible," Friedel said. "We've had a great ride."

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(BEGIN TEXT OF INFOBOX)

Consulting the Rule Book

In the 49th minute of Friday's Germany-United States World Cup quarterfinal, a shot by American Gregg Berhalter bounced off German goalkeeper Oliver Kahn and hit the left arm of German defender Torsten Frings, who was standing on the goal line.

Scottish referee Hugh Dallas did not call a hand-ball on Frings. While Dallas might not have seen Frings touch the ball, even if the referee had, he would not be obligated to issue the United States a penalty kick.

According to Law 12 of the International Football Assn. Board's Laws of the Game, the rule book for soccer:

"A direct free kick is awarded to the opposing team if a player

However, if in the referee's opinion the ball hit Frings' arm inadvertently, then he need not make a call, as a later note explains:

"If the ball strikes the defender accidentally, no offense is committed."

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Associated Press

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