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Circuit Court's Ruling on Pledge of Allegiance

June 28, 2002

Re "Pledge of Allegiance Violates Constitution, Court Declares," June 27: The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals was absolutely right in its ruling on the Pledge of Allegiance. The phrase "under God" belongs there no more than "under Allah" or "under Isis." Religion is a private, sacred connection between an individual and his or her God or gods. Government has no right to intrude in any way on the very personal choice to worship a divine being or not to worship at all. Those who are threatening the family that brought the lawsuit are certainly not living up to the ideals of love and tolerance expressed in most religions.

The Taliban ran Afghanistan on religious principles, and what a disaster that was! And finally, we should keep in mind that it was extreme religious fervor that brought down the World Trade Center. Separation of church and state is the American way.

Russ Nichols

Los Angeles

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Re "A Godforsaken Ruling," editorial, June 27: During World War II, those of us who were in elementary school recited the Pledge of Allegiance each day without the phrase "under God," and it would seem he has greatly blessed our indivisible America, anyway, as we deists did our praying in private, as it should be done.

Jack Redmond

North Hollywood

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In 1864 the motto "In God We Trust" first appeared on our coinage. In the mid-1960s it first appeared on our paper money, and it's on many public buildings and historic documents. The ruling about the pledge is nonsense. No child is required to recite the pledge--only to stand and be respectful during its recitation. Atheists objected in 1954 about the additional phrase, and it has stood the test of time. If the pledge were mandatory or required a signed allegiance, then maybe it would be unconstitutional.

Sol Taylor

Sherman Oaks

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The Bush administration and some members of Congress are so outraged by this ruling that they are now going to do everything in their power to try to change it. I surely wish they were just as vigorous about "less" serious issues like health care and the environment.

George Guzman

El Toro

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