Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections

Shoplifting Actress Stars in Courtroom Drama

November 12, 2002

Winona Ryder will not be sentenced to jail, according to the prosecutor of her theft case, Deputy Dist. Atty. Ann Rundle ("Ryder Found Guilty in Shoplifting Case," Nov. 7). I work as a chaplain in a jail and know the difficulties women face in this environment. I am happy that Ryder does not have to endure the humiliation. How is it, though, that a celebrity who is found guilty of stealing $5,500 serves no jail sentence, while the economically poor women I meet each day, who have often stolen much less to feed or clothe their children, must serve unduly long sentences? They may serve as long as six months, or even go to prison, leaving behind their children to the system if there is no one to care for them.

It amazes me that we put so much emphasis on helping poor women and children in other countries while poor or homeless women in our own city must resort to desperate measures for survival and then be punished for doing so. I hope that Ryder will be assigned to some of our women's shelters to see for herself the abused, abandoned, hungry, poor women and children. Perhaps her celebrity status will aid in advancing liberty and justice for all.

Rosemary O'Malley

Los Angeles

*

The Ryder case is arguably the most over-prosecuted case in history. If she had not been a celebrity, the prosecution would have plea-bargained it to a misdemeanor because she had no prior criminal history. And it has been reported that Rundle gave up a murder case to pursue this one (Oct. 23). It seems obvious to me that the only reason this case went to trial, as a felony, is because Rundle wanted her 15 minutes of fame.

Robert Cole

Bellflower

*

There was a notable actress who lived in a town (that we moved from) who was a darling ... and a kleptomaniac. She made several popular movies and everyone liked her. When her little problem started, her people, her family, someone went to the local stores to explain and assured them that the stolen items would be returned or paid for. Just give a call and it would be rectified right away. There was no shouting "shame" or media feast, no waste of money for a public prosecutor, a judge or a jury for something that we all know is an illness. Must we continually slide backward?

June Cox

Yucca Valley

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|