Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections

News, Tips & Bargains

Rain May Boost Fall Colors in Some Regions

September 08, 2002|Jane Engle

Recent rainfall may aid a fall foliage season in southern New England threatened by drought. Meanwhile, rainfall has been close to normal in parts of northern New England.

"Without a substantial amount of rainfall, I think we're going to have a muted [fall foliage] season," said Glenn Dryer, director of the Connecticut College Arboretum in New London. "Some trees have already begun to drop leaves, and that's early here." Before recent rains, southern New England's rainfall this year was down about 12 inches, or about a third less than average, he said.

In Vermont, rainfall has been average in the northeast and up to 1 1/2 inches below average in the southeast and west from January through July, said state climatologist Lesley-Ann Dupigny-Giroux. July and August were very dry, which has caused some maples to turn, she added. New Hampshire recorded slightly above-average rain from January through July.

Experts say a moderate drought like the one in Vermont can enhance red colors in leaves, but a severe drought may cause leaves to drop prematurely. Exact predictions are impossible, they say.

Last week the U.S. Forest Service was scheduled to open its Fall Color Hotline, (800) 354-4595, which reports on conditions nationwide; similar information is on the Internet site www.fs.fed.us/news/fallcolors.

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|