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BEST BETS: Sunday 9/22

September 19, 2002

all day

Art

It's a wrap. Or a celebration of wrap really, as the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego salutes the fabric and fiber-draped temporary monuments of Christo and Jeanne-Claude in "Christo and Jeanne-Claude in the Vogel Collection From the National Gallery of Art," opening Sunday. For those not familiar with the works of Christo, the conceptual artist has a history of building enormous, temporary installations such as the 24-mile "running fence" across Sonoma and Marin counties, a forest of 3,100 giant blue-and-gold umbrellas in Los Angeles and Tokyo, a golden-wrapped Pont Neuf bridge in Paris and a shiny-wrapped Reichstag. The first such survey in the U.S. will feature 61 objects including several early-wrapped packages, models for large-scale public works, drawings and collages for projects in urban and rural sites, and photographs of completed projects.

"Christo and Jeanne-Claude "in the Vogel Collection From the National Gallery of Art," Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego, 700 Prospect St., La Jolla. Ends Jan. 5. Daily, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Thursdays, 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; closed Wednesdays. Adults, $6; students and seniors, $2; children younger than 12, free. (858) 454-3541.

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7:30pm

Pop Music

Bonnie Raitt not only talks the talk of environmental activism, she also walks the walk. For her current tour, on which she shares the bill with Texas singer-songwriter Lyle Lovett, some of the trucks carting her gear from town to town use diesel fuel made from soybeans. The Burbank-born musician also is giving exposure to clean-burning vehicles and various environmentally friendly businesses, mirroring her musical quest for pure emotion through 16 pop-blues albums over three decades.

Bonnie Raitt and Lyle Lovett & His Large Band, Greek Theatre, 2700 Vermont Canyon Road, L.A. 7:30 p.m. $40 to $75. Also 7:30 p.m. Monday. (323) 665-1927.

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7:30pm

Movies

The tempestuous collaboration between well-known children's author-illustrator Maurice Sendak and the modern dance company Pilobolus is the subject of Mirra Bank's documentary, "Last Dance." The film follows the process between the writer and the dance troupe as they turn a poignant tale from the Holocaust into a forceful dance-theater event. Director Bank will introduce the film and participate in a post-screening discussion. It's screening in conjunction with the Skirball's exhibition "Where the Wild Things Are: Maurice Sendak in His Own Words and Pictures."

"Last Dance," Skirball Cultural Center, Magnin Auditorium, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., L.A. 7:30 p.m. $4 to $8. (323) 655-8587.

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11am

Leisure

Having the Dodgers and the Angels in the running for the playoffs this year is the perfect pitch for "Baseball as America," a traveling exhibit premiering at L.A.'s Natural History Museum and organized by the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y. On this opening festival day, visitors not only will see the exhibit of more than 500 of baseball's most precious artifacts--including the Doubleday Ball, from the alleged first real game in 1839, and the world's most valuable baseball card--but also may try out vintage bats and balls, ballpark food and music, and meet Hall of Fame Dodger slugger Duke Snider.

"Baseball as America," Natural History Museum of L.A. County, 900 Exposition Blvd., L.A. Festival on south lawn, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free. (213) 763-DINO or www.nhm.org.

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