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Bush's Attitude Alienates Potential Allies on Iraq

September 19, 2002

I could not agree more with "War Issue Imperils Constitution" (Commentary, Sept. 17). Not only would President Bush's proposed attack on Iraq violate the Constitution, it would also violate the United Nations charter--a document that the U.S. helped author and has signed and ratified, giving it the weight of law. According to the charter, member nations may not engage unilaterally in military actions against foreign powers unless they are defending themselves against a physical attack. If not under attack, member nations are required to petition the U.N. Security Council, which must first seek nonviolent solutions before authorizing a military response. The objective of removing Saddam Hussein from power violates elements of the charter that require members to respect the sovereignty of all nations.

Bush's rejection of Iraq's offer to allow unconditional weapons inspections shows both his arrogance and his preference for violence as a "solution" to problems, but his failure to cooperate with the world community will only serve to increase the hostility directed against the U.S. and to further threaten our security here at home.

David Holland

Northridge

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Bush's consistent and ill-considered bravado, exemplified by his recent speech saying "the greatest nation on the face of the Earth" is going after terrorists one by one, only irritates friends and foes alike ("Al Qaeda Suspect in U.S. Hands," Sept. 17). The U.S. does not need someone who lacks the finesse to project subtle yet seriously effective political messages. His brash attitude is doing more harm than he realizes.

Manuel E. Nunes

Garden Grove

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In his Sept. 15 political cartoon (Commentary), Michael Ramirez makes a comparison between Bush and Winston Churchill. If this comparison is a fair one, let us hope that Bush can emulate the Churchill who led the United Kingdom through World War II and not the Churchill who sent thousands of British and Commonwealth troops to their needless deaths at Gallipoli during World War I.

Steven M. Grubisic

San Pedro

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Re "Men of God, Warriors for Peace, Enemies of War," Commentary, Sept. 16: Leonard Beerman, James Lawson, Maher Hathout and George Regas are fraudulent representatives of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. They give lip service to the sacred texts of their respective faiths and sound suspiciously like--surprise!--left-wing radicals. Their peace-at-any-price philosophy is precisely what emboldens despots and terrorists worldwide. Thankfully, most Americans still understand that meaningful peace cannot be achieved apart from justice and that war, unfortunately, is sometimes necessary.

Tom Houg

South Pasadena

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