Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections

A Conservative Questions the GOP

August 15, 2003

Re "Stepping Off the Platform," by Clyde Prestowitz, Opinion, Aug. 10: Thanks for giving voice to the increasing number of conservatives questioning the Bush administration. It was a great source of irony to me during Operation Iraqi Freedom that the most articulate and principled arguments against the war in Iraq were often written by conservatives. It is extremely welcome to read a conservative saying what I've been thinking for some time: "There is nothing conservative about the giant military-industrial establishment, budget deficits or failing local and state governments." Hallelujah! Someone noticed.

Renee Leask

Glendale

*

I am a secular humanist and, not surprisingly, a liberal. The GOP platform has never been one that I could remotely identify with, but in these "interesting times" we're experiencing, platforms appear to be in stark contrast to reality regardless of party affiliation. Prestowitz is not alone in feeling betrayed by his identifiable party. What we are witnessing today is a hijacking of many diverse American values by a fanatical group bent on taking America where no one in the last 200-plus years remotely wanted to go.

Peter Hughes

Los Alamitos

*

It was refreshing to read Prestowitz's opinion piece. A conservative Republican, he expressed the views of a lot of people, Republicans and Democrats and independents, who are appalled at the erosion of Republican values (small government, restrained foreign policy, balanced budgets, protection of individual rights) by the current administration.

In contrast, in the same section, Rush Limbaugh continues to spew his normal venom on Bill Clinton, the NAACP and an assortment of Democrats who don't support his narrow viewpoints ("Land of the Free-for-All," Commentary, Aug. 10). This is the same Limbaugh who pushed the Newt Gingrich revolution upon us (whatever happened to Newt?) and daily makes apologies for the mistakes and follies of the Bush administration -- without admitting that during the Clinton administration the economy was much better than today, government was smaller and we had a surplus in the national budget. It would be fun to see a debate between these two gentlemen, but that will never happen because Limbaugh doesn't allow for differing opinions, even from his own party.

Jon Jackson

Aliso Viejo

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|