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The Inside Track

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June 11, 2003|Larry Stewart

A consumer's guide to the best and worst of sports media and merchandise. Ground rules: If it can be read, heard, observed, viewed, dialed or downloaded, it's in play here. One exception: No products will be endorsed.

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What: "Somewhere in Ireland a Village Is Missing an Idiot."

Author: David Feherty.

Publisher: Rugged Land, LLC.

Price: $23.95.

Most golf fans know David Feherty as the wisecracking Irish commentator on CBS who often teams with Gary McCord for no telling what. Some may know Feherty as a golfer who had 10 victories in 21 years on the European Tour, won more than $3 million and was a member of the 1991 European Ryder Cup team.

Then there is Feherty the writer. He authored a New York Times bestseller, "A Nasty Bit of Rough," and regularly pens columns for Golf Magazine and a Web site, golfonline.com.

In this 301-page collection of those writings, Feherty, as the title suggests, is at his self-effacing best.

Speculating on who might replace CBS colleague Ken Venturi upon his retirement (before the network tabbed Lanny Wadkins), Feherty wrote, "We need to find someone who has won a major, isn't afraid of giving an opinion, has the respect of the players, and isn't worried if some people think he's a jerk," Feherty writes. "I'd do the job myself, but I'm only one for four."

Feherty touches on all kinds of topics, and goes places others can't because he writes under the cloak of humor. For example, he writes, "Generally speaking, women are not as good at golf as men, but, for the record, making a golf swing is harder to do if you happen to be the owner of a pair of breasts."

A similar observation contributed to the downfall of former CBS commentator Ben Wright. But Feherty also notes that he at one time had "quite impressive cleavage." He adds, "And I can tell you my pair definitely got in the way of my swing."

Feherty does not intend to insult anyone. He aims to put a smile on the face of the reader, which he accomplishes.

-- Larry Stewart

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